www.MindandBodyExercises.com: Blog https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog en-us (C) 2024 CAD Graphics, Inc. [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) Sun, 14 Jan 2024 16:39:00 GMT Sun, 14 Jan 2024 16:39:00 GMT https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/img/s/v-12/u563229173-o1067742590-50.jpg www.MindandBodyExercises.com: Blog https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog 120 69 Holistic Health Illustrated Study Booklets https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2024/1/Holistic-Health-Illustrated-Study-Booklets Remember the Indiana Jones movies, where Indy (Harrison Ford) found his father’s diary, which had very important sketches, notes, and other clues to aid his search for the Holy Grail? Well, I have been searching for over 40 years for the “Holy Grail” of health, wellness, fitness and self-awareness. I have been producing graphic posters and graphic study booklets to depict what I believe to be the key components of better health, fitness, well-being and relative happiness. My publications consist mostly of pages showing color graphics of concepts for better health and wellness. I draw my illustrations from my knowledge of allopathic and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), qigong, martial arts, yoga and philosophy on these topics. There are depictions of theories on the human life cycle, psychology relative to components of fitness and many other subjects pertaining to mental and physical well-being. Most of my booklets contain many exercise sets for rehabilitating injuries and illness, as well as others to promote longevity and a better quality of life.


These booklets are the summation of over 40 years of my training, education, teaching and public speaking of holistic health, qigong, fitness, wellness, TCM, martial arts and other facets of self-improvement. Similar to popular study guides such as Quick Study or PermaCharts, these graphic and text guides cut to the chase in order to minimize precious time spent muddling through extensive textbooks seeking understanding of specific concepts. Each guide is packed with the root knowledge regarding specific topics. This format is highly beneficial for the novice as well as experts in the fields of health, wellness and self-improvement.

Books published and available:

Here are links for a low-res thumbnail-look inside of:

Book 1 – Alternative Exercises:
https://…/book-1-alternative-exercises-multiple-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 2 – Core Training:
https://…/book-2-core-training-multiple-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 3 – Strength Training:
https://…/book-3-strength-training-mulitple-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 4 – Combo of 1-3:
https://…/book-4-combo-book-1-3-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 5 – Energizing Your Inner Strength
https://…/book-5-energizing-your-inner-strength-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 6 – Methods to Achieve Better Wellness:
https://…/book-6-methods-to-achieve-better-wellness-thumbnail-view.pdf
Book 7 – Coaching & Instructor Training Guide

Book 8 – The 5 Elements & the Cycles of Change
https://…/book-17-the-5-elements—the-cycles-of-change-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 9 – Opening the 9 Gates & Filling 8 Vessels-Intro Set 1:
https://…/book7-intro-set-opening-the-9-gates—filling-8-vessels-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 10 – Opening the 9 Gates & Filling 8 Vessels-sets 1 to 8:
https://…/book8-the-8-vessels-9sets-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 11 – Meridians, Reflexology & Acupressure:
https://…/book-9-acupressure-techniques-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 12 – Herbal Extracts, Dit Da Jow & Iron Palm Liniments:
https://…/book-10-herbal-extracts-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 13 – Deep Breathing Benefits for the Blood, Oxygen & Qi:
https://…/book-11-deep-breathing-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 14 – Reflexology for Stroke Side Effects:
https://…/book-12-exercises-for-stroke-side-effects-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 15 – Iron Body & Iron Palm
https://…/book-15-iron-palm—iron-body–thumbnail-preview-.pdf

Book 17 – Fascial Train Stretches & Chronic Pain Management
https://…/book18-fascial-trains-pain-managment-thumnail-view.pdf

Book 18 – BaguaZhang
https://…/book-18-baguazhang-fundamentals–thumnail-preview-.pdf

Book 19 – Tai Chi Fundamentals
https://…/book-19-tai-chi–thumbnail-view-.pdf

Book 20 – Qigong (breath-work)
https://…/book-20-qigong–breath-work—thumbnail-view-.pdf

Book 21 – Wind & Water Make Fire
https://…/book-21-wind—water–thumbnail-view-.pdf

Book 22 – Back Pain Management
https://…/book19-back-pain-managment-thumbnail-view.pdf

Book 23 – Journey Around the Sun-2nd Edition:
https://…/journey-around-the-sun-intro-pages-9-18.pdf

Book 24 – Graphic Reference Book:
https://mindandbodyexercises.wordpress.com/2023/06/14/book-24-health-wellness-graphic-reference-book/

Book 26 – Whole Health Wisdom: Navigating Holistic Wellness: 
https://mindandbodyexercises.wordpress.com/2023/12/06/whole-health-wisdom-navigating-holistic-wellness-my-new-book/

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Study booklets, graphic charts & herbal extracts can be purchased at:

Study Booklets, Charts & Herbal Extracts

Also, I have most of my publications available through Amazon at:

www.amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

_________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care holistic health martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease promotional ptsd qigong self care stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2024/1/Holistic-Health-Illustrated-Study-Booklets Sat, 13 Jan 2024 05:00:00 GMT
The Teacher/Student Relationship https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2024/1/The-Teacher/Student-Relationship Seek the right teacher for you, because in time a student (you) can become similar to your teacher, sometimes absorbing good and bad traits alike.

“Learn to earn”
One must learn something and understand it effectively before teaching it to another. It is usually quite difficult to teach another what you yourself are not proficient with. Learn to understand – earn to have purpose and meaning. Jack of all trades, master of none – think about it, do you know something well enough to help another rather that hurting them with what you do or do not know? Not everyone who carries the title of teacher, is indeed a good teacher.

Teaching visually as well as audibly.

The Teacher/student relationship
In the teaching and learning environment, there has to be an even exchange of energy. The teacher shares their knowledge while the student listens, watches, absorbs and hopefully learns and applies. Gratitude is a reciprocating relationship between student and teacher, because if there is no teacher, there is no student. If there is no student, there is no teacher. Yin and yang in all things. Teachers too, benefit from this relationship. Teachers, first responders, armed forces members, public service workers and others don’t help others just for others to benefit. These types of individuals often find purpose and meaning through their service to others. At the very root of these endeavors is indeed a self-serving motivation that needs to be kept in check. Helping and teaching others to have purpose is one thing; indulging a god complex is another. A god complex is when an individual truly believes they have a greater power, influence, ability, etc., and see themselves as superior to others. A god complex behavior is often associated with having a narcissistic personality disorder. We all have much to offer and learn from one another, regardless of fame, wealth or social status.

A wise and experienced teacher realizes that not everyone learns the same way and adjusts accordingly. Some teachers are better at this than others as not all teachers are the same. Various students are better at grasping concepts through graphic or visual presentations, while others gravitate towards the sounds of words. Some may visualize the words in their mind’s eye. While still others learn best through touch and movement, where they need to be physically engaged in order to mentally comprehend concepts.

Teaching verbally, visually and tactilely.

Embrace the “beginner’s mind.”

Students and teachers alike can benefit from understanding that they cannot fill a full cup, without first emptying what they already have. Once a student’s ego lets go of what one thinks they already know, they can then be open to learn something new or see something from a different perspective. Teachers can often learn much from their students if they are open to it and not let their own ego get in the way of their own learning from a student.

Learn so that you can earn a living and hopefully a purpose!

Learning ability/environment later in life

It is never too late to learn something new. Those who were once a teacher, can be a student once again. We are only limited by our own boundaries. However, learning ability does change as we move through the various phases of life. Short term memory becomes just that, shorter. We may remember complex details from our youth but fail to remember someone’s name that we were just introduced to seconds prior. Memory is indeed a muscle that needs to be exercised continuously in order to keep it working effectively. Sitting in a classroom or behind a computer screen can have a toll on the physical body, so plan accordingly and find the format that works best for your circumstances.


Fees for instruction

Fees and/or tuition are almost always necessary, in order for the teacher/student relationship to flourish. Time, effort and monetary compensation are all forms or conduits of energy. Sometimes labor (physical as well as mental) in return for knowledge is a viable commodity and can offer many opportunities for personal growth. No fee, cost or sacrifice on some level = NO VALUE. No skin in the game most often leads to no commitment or investment of one’s time and effort. Give a young adult an automobile and often they don’t care about maintenance, dings or scratches. The spoiled or entitled individual sooner or later learns a whole different set of life lessons. The person that saves and buys their own vehicle, often takes more pride and care of their assets, as they realize and value the time, effort and sacrifice that they put on the line for their own personal gain. Most people know this in spite of looking for the best deal or “free any things”. We usually pay for what we get, good or bad quality. Teachers need to earn living and be rightfully compensated for their time, effort and sharing of their earned knowledge.

___________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care human behavior martial arts center for health osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2024/1/The-Teacher/Student-Relationship Wed, 10 Jan 2024 05:00:00 GMT
Fracture Cascade – a domino effect of ailments https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2024/1/Fracture-Cascade-a-domino-effect-of-ailments

A “fracture cascade” refers to bones and ailments such as osteoporosis, where a person experiences multiple fractures in a sequence, often initiated by a single initial fracture. Falling is a major reason leading to such circumstances. When bones weaken due to poor nutrition, inactivity and age, osteopenia and osteoporosis can grow into serious medical conditions. Herein bones become less dense and more porous, which can make bones more prone to fractures. This “fracture cascade” highlights the possibility of a domino effect that can manifest in individuals with osteoporosis. Falling and landing on one’s hand, can cause fractures to the fingers, wrist, bones in the forearm (ulna and radius) and the bones that comprise the shoulder joint. Additionally, when someone falls, they may injure their knees, hip joints (head of the femur) as well as injuries to the spinal vertebrae. Having a physical exercise plan that not only increases bone strength, but helps to improve balance, and flexibility as well as strength of the muscles. Grip strength becomes more important as we age and sometimes need to grab on to solid structures to avoid falling. Weight training, yoga, tai chi and Pilates are all appropriate methods to achieve these goals.

Practicing exercises that challenge one’s balance is a key component to prevent falling, while increasing leg strength and flexibility to navigate falls.
These images show the various hand and wrist positioning that are common when people accidentally fall onto, while trying to mitigate falls.

A fracture cascade might occur from the following circumstances:

  1. Initial fracture – A person with osteoporosis experiences an initial fracture, often as a result of some level of impact, stress or trauma on particular weakened bone(s).
  2. Modified or influenced body mechanics – After the first fracture, body mechanics during physical movement may be influenced reducing mobility, pain and changes in gait.
  3. Increased risk of falling – Modified mechanics and reduced mobility leads to an increased risk of losing sense of balance, which is often elevated in individuals with osteoporosis.
  4. Future fractures – Minor physical trauma, stumbles or minor to major falls can lead to a ripple (cascade) effect of additional fractures in other bones throughout the body.
  5. Compromised Functionality: With each additional fracture, an individual’s freedom to move and function unimpaired can be at further jeopardy, making them even more prone to future falls and fractures.

This cycle of decline can contribute to compromised overall health and thereby quality of life for those with osteoporosis. Management strategies for osteoporosis should involve prevention through lifestyle modifications, dietary awareness (rich in calcium and vitamin D), weight-bearing exercises and activities. If necessary, there are pharmaceuticals intended to improve bone density and reduce fracture risk. However, almost all medications have side-effect that needed to be weighed against their benefits. It is highly important that individuals at risk with osteopenia/osteoporosis seek healthcare professionals as well as fitness and wellness advocates to pursue a comprehensive plan for bone health.

This graphic details various exercises to help increase strength, flexibility, and dexterity of the wrists, hands and fingers. One can practice these exercises as a form of preventive maintenance.

______________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care martial arts center for health osteoporosis parkinsons disease physiology ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2024/1/Fracture-Cascade-a-domino-effect-of-ailments Sat, 06 Jan 2024 05:00:00 GMT
Walking Aids in Venous Return – or walk more, your life might depend upon it! https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2024/1/Walking-Aids-in-Venous-Return-or-walk-more-your-life-might-depend-upon-it Walking and other weight-bearing activities that engage the muscles in the feet, calves and thighs illicit a pumping effect that aids in moving blood back to the heart. Rhythmic patterns of relaxation and contraction of these muscles, in addition to the movement of the ankle and toe joints, help to increase venous return and help to prevent blood pooling in the lower extremities. Lack of physical movement such as walking and an increase in sitting within our modern American sedentary lifestyle, are major factors that are contributing to the drastic decline in physical and mental wellness of our population within the last decades. More sitting for hours on end at work, behind computer screens, playing video games and engagement with social media are the norm now. In past years physical activity was more prevalent whether from occupations, recreation, social interactions and other reasons. A return to a more active lifestyle is what is necessary to get our nation back on a track of better health and wellness, in lieu of harsh pharmaceuticals for all that ails us, and pursuing living a life without consequences. We are the architects of our own well-being and relative health and happiness.

The venous plantar plexus of the foot, the venous pump of the calf and the thigh muscle pump all work together as part of the venous return mechanism, which sends blood back to the heart. The venous pump of the calf, also referred to as the calf muscle pump, is a very important component of this whole mechanism involving the relaxation and contraction of calf and foot muscles during specific activities such as walking, climbing, exercising and others. The primary muscles of the calf muscle pump are the gastrocnemius and soleus. This engagement of the calf muscles compresses the veins and pushing blood upwards against gravity. The venous plantar plexus is a bundle of veins found in the sole of the foot, having a primary function of collecting de-oxygenated blood from tissues within the foot and moving it back upwards towards the heart. Other muscles in the foot, such as the flexor hallucis brevis, flexor digitorum brevis, and lumbrical muscles, influence toe flexion and extension and consequently help with increasing blood circulation. Both of these mechanisms within the calves and feet contribute to providing efficient blood circulation back up to the heart, as well as preventing blood pooling (edema) in the lower extremities.

I have been practicing for over 40 years a type of moving meditation called BaguaZhang or 8-trigram palm, which is a walking meditation with various feet, hands, arms, and body positioning. When practiced with rapid (or sometimes slow) breathing and circular walking or stepping patterns, a great amount of qi (the Chinese word for life force) or prana (in Ayurveda), is accumulated within the body for martial, fitness or wellness applications. Conversely, the same methods can be practiced with a slower respiration rate of 6-10 BPM or even slower for more health and spiritual focused practices. I have received many benefits from these practices on mental, physical, and spiritual levels. Mentally, I feel more aware, alert, and calm throughout my day after a 20-minute session of practice. Physically, my whole body is stronger as the exercises engage many more muscle groups than conventional exercise. Spiritually, I am much more self-aware, as well as feeling more connected to nature and the energy or universal consciousness that we have access to. In today’s current norm of many coping with stress, anxiety, depression and many other psychological and physical issues, many types of exercise can be a much-needed option in lieu of pharmaceuticals or other invasive treatments. Basic walking is a great means of maintaining wellness, while advanced methods of walking such as BaguaZhang can offer benefits on many levels beyond locomotion. Studies on BaguaZhang have shown that these types of exercises were able to significantly affect the delicate balance of autonomic control, by way of increasing parasympathetic regulation while decreasing sympathetic nerve activity. Also reported were decreased were levels in serum glucose, cholesterol, body mass index and systolic blood pressure. Lastly, innate and adaptive immunity improved, as well as increased in physical fitness and physical strength for those who participated in a 10-week study (Tai, Chou, Tzeng, Wei, Su, Liu, & Kung, 2018).

References:

Parts of the figure were drawn by using pictures from Servier Medical Art. Servier Medical Art by Servier is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

Tai, H.-C., Chou, Y.-S., Tzeng, I.-S., Wei, C.-Y., Su, C.-H., Liu, W.-C., & Kung, W.-M. (2018). Effect of Tai Chi Synergy T1 Exercise on Autonomic Function, Metabolism, and Physical Fitness of Healthy Individuals. Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine (ECAM), 2018, 1–7. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1155/2018/6351938

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I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

]]>
[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care holistic martial arts center for health osteoporosis parkinsons disease physiology qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2024/1/Walking-Aids-in-Venous-Return-or-walk-more-your-life-might-depend-upon-it Wed, 03 Jan 2024 05:00:00 GMT
Seek Out the “Wounded Healers” https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2024/1/Seek-Out-the-Wounded-Healers Would you seek dental help from a dentist with rotten teeth?

Ask for relationship advice from someone that has a record of domestic abuse?

Take your car to a mechanic whose own automobile is always broken down?

Then why would you seek advice on health and well-being from someone who themselves is not healthy and well?


I have previously come across the concept of the “wounded healer.” There is no shortage of books and articles on this topic, where people that have first-hand experience with surviving trauma are often the best empaths for a particular issue. Psychologist Carl Jung may have been the first to use this term back in 1951, where he proposed that disease of the soul could be the most advantageous type of training for a healer. Jung was thought to believe that only a wounded physician could heal effectively. An empath that truly understands another’s circumstances may be of great benefit and perhaps provide a guiding path to post-traumatic growth (PTG). PTG is the term for what happens when someone who struggles psychologically from trauma and adversity, comes to experience positive, transformative changes in their mindset and behavior. “Finding the silver lining in all things, good or bad,” is a quote many of us are quite familiar with.

How can something “good” come from things that are seemingly “bad?” While I don’t think anyone truly looks forward to any personal loss and/or suffering on any level, there are sometimes good aspects that can come out of even the worst of circumstances. Losses or misfortunes can offer the possibility of life-enhancing “post-traumatic growth” as someone weaves the lessons of loss and resilience into their life moving forward. Personal growth following major experiences of loss is common (Hall, 2014). From my experiences in teaching fitness, wellness, and mindfulness, I have found most people do not have a deeper connection to their own health, well-being, or consciousness until some event of trauma as a life-threatening or life-changing situation enters into their life. Loss of life of a family member or close friend can be the spark that causes another to change their behaviors. Someone passing of a heart attack at an early age, might motivate others to watch their own health closer. Mental or physical trauma can sometimes lead to what some call “knowing one’s true self”, self-realization or enlightenment. Taoism and Buddhism has taught me decades ago, that trauma can be means to knowing one’s true self. Trauma can be very intense and life-changing experiences that an individual may become so affected, that they may appear to others to have evolved overnight into a different person. Many of us have encountered someone who while in dire straits, promises to change their ways if their circumstances where to play out in their favor. Changes of this sort can be viewed as positive or negative, as all things are relative. Change through motivation, stemming from trauma.

View public domain image source here

I have discussed alcoholism in some of my past posts here, as it is a topic that I am quite familiar with. We can see the wounded healer here, where survivors of alcoholism or those who have experienced alcohol abuse-related relationships often have firsthand experience with coping with alcohol related issues. Similarly, survivors of abusive relationships and varying levels of trauma have been wounded themselves but can also help others to heal by extending empathy and, if sought, advice. This same concept may hold validity for survivors of law enforcement related events, survivors of war trauma as soldiers and/or civilians, healthcare workers, firefighters and many others involved in service to others. However, in order to serve effectively as a wounded healer, this individual needs to be able to manage their own stress, suffering and other mental and physical ailments before extending their advice to others that are suffering. Otherwise, this individual, while having good intentions, may actually come off as being less understanding, less empathetical and perhaps hypocritical, and therefore causing more harm to a sufferer.

(1) Survivors of alcoholism or those who have experienced alcohol abuse-related relationships

(2) Survivors of abusive relationships on all levels of trauma

(3) Survivors of violence and/or law enforcement related events

(4) Survivors of war trauma as soldiers and/or civilians

(5) Survivors from cults and other particular groups

(6) Survivors of physical accidents or catastrophe

References:

Daneault S. The wounded healer: can this idea be of use to family physicians? Can Fam Physician. 2008 Sep;54(9):1218-9, 1223-5. PMID: 18791082; PMCID: PMC2553448.

https://www.azquotes.com/quote/1200463

Hall, C. (2014). Bereavement theory: recent developments in our understanding of grief and bereavement. Bereavement Care, 33(1), 7–12. https://doi.org/10.1080/02682621.2014.902610

__________________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

]]>
[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care holistic health human behavior martial arts center for health osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2024/1/Seek-Out-the-Wounded-Healers Mon, 01 Jan 2024 05:00:00 GMT
Rough Initiations – Rites of Passage https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Rough-Initiations-Rites-of-Passage Rough initiations is another term for rites of passage, which can be ceremonial events that mark important transitions in an individual’s life. A rough initiation refers to the challenging aspects of an initiation process or symbolic ritual. These events often involve the change of one’s social status, roles, or responsibilities within a family, group or community. Initiations are a common element within rites of passage, taking various forms or presentations. Challenges may involve physical and/or psychological challenges of endurance, meant to push an individual to achieve their full potential, capacity or limits. By overcoming these challenges, the individual can demonstrate their willingness and qualifications to accept new roles or responsibilities within a particular group or community. Rough initiations are integral to various cultures and traditions around the world, where they are often designed specifically to assess an individual’s strength, fortitude, courage, resilience, and loyalty to a group or community. Details and particulars for rough initiations vary widely, but most have the underlying purpose of facilitating personal growth, strengthening of social bonds, and promoting a sense of identity and worth within the group.

I don’t think that our current American culture offers much in the way of positive reinforcement of any real “coming of age” initiations or rites of passage. Common American initiations over the years have typically been the introductions of smoking cigarettes, drinking of alcohol, driving our first automobile, graduation from high school, and religious ceremonies of confirmation, bar/bat mitzvahs and other initiations that usher the individual into adulthood. Some of these previous examples other than the religious ones, can on some level be loosely interpreted as Francis Weller defined initiation, as “a contained encounter with death.” Upon further reading of Francis Weller’s Rough Initiations, what first started to catch my attention is that not everyone experiences things quite the same way. For what may be traumatic for one individual might be trivial or an inconvenience for another. My understanding of trauma beyond the actual definition of events that our done to someone mentally and physically that manifest suffering to the individual, is that trauma most often comes at us unwelcomed, unannounced and usually free of a monetary charge. Initiations (rough or otherwise) on the other hand, are often welcomed, announced well ahead of time, seen as acceptance into adulthood, and for some there may be a monetary reward or financial fee in order for the initiation to be held. Trauma is firsthand experiences or witnessing of physical injury/violence, abusive/toxic environments, death of a loved one, etc. Modern day rough initiations might be seen in religious ceremonies, the first hunt/fishing, cold/hot plunge, an intense mountain hike, college all-nighter, fasting, isolation, sleep deprivation and other tests that may challenge someone to perform at higher levels of physical activity and mental discipline. Basically, trauma comes to us, whereas we may pursue rough initiations, or so I have come to understand. We are all quite literally wired differently in regard to our own physiological nervous system, that often helps us to interpret stimuli as either positive or negative to mental, physical, and spiritual well-being. I do think that other cultures, may still hold their initiations of upmost importance, as I have come to learn more about that of indigenous peoples throughout the world.

This is not a new concept as we can see examples from ancient times, where groups such as the Spartans, Romans, Vikings, Samurai, Mongols, the Knights Templar, Benedictines, Franciscans, Native Indigenous people worldwide, secret societies, and perhaps many others have had their own particular initiations and rites of passage. In more modern times, rough initiations can still be found in various presentations, although they may not be as common or standardized as some traditional cultural practices. Here are some examples:

  1. Cultural or Social Initiations: Cultures, subcultures or social groups can have initiation rituals that require symbolic actions or engaging in challenging tasks that can range from endurance challenges to symbolic acts designed to demonstrate loyalty to the values of a group.
  2. Fraternity/Sorority Hazing: Many organizations discourage, restrict and even ban hazing, however some fraternities and sororities still include initiation rituals that can be physically or emotionally challenging.
  3. Sports Initiations: College and professional sports may have initiation rituals that involve rookies undergoing tasks or challenges, or participation in team-building events in order to demonstrate their commitment or loyalty to their team.
  4. Military Training: Military basic training involves physically and mentally challenging tasks needed to prepare recruits for the demanding risks they may encounter in their roles as soldiers. Initiation activities may include intense physical fitness routines, such as “hell week,” and other psychological stress events that help to build discipline, resilience and camaraderie.
  5. Specialized Training Programs: Elite military units, law enforcement agencies, first responder emergency teams and others may require their members to participate in stressful training which may be considered as extremely rough initiations, to ensure they are prepared for life and death situations.

Authors in the book and movie industry have played an enormous role in promoting this whole concept of rough initiations as can be seen in a seemingly endless stream of titles such as Star Wars, Harry Potter, Narnia, The Matrix and many, many others. Challenging initiations can help to cultivate a sense of belonging, camaraderie and commitment, however there is a nuanced relationship between beneficial rites of passage and detrimental hazing practices. Many organizations now deliberately discourage or restrict activities that can potentially put individuals at physical or mental risk, compromising their overall well-being. Most would agree that responsible and respectable initiation processes should focus on the individual’s personal growth, social connections, and instilling a positive sense of belonging.

Iron Palm training (strategic trauma or rough initiations)

Reading Rough Initiations brought some memories back from my first years in my martial arts (cult)ure and having experienced many initiations. I refer to it as such because at this time of the early 1980’s, American and Eastern cultures from China and Korea did not exactly assimilate well with each other in the conservative Midwest. One person’s culture can very well be seen as another’s cult. This can be quite apparent as seen today regarding one’s religious, philosophical, and sometimes political beliefs. Even facets in pop culture, social issues and sports can reflect this divide between perspectives of what trends seem to have their own culture. With the former being said, the martial arts community of years past was often viewed as having its own unique culture as demonstrated in its traditions, rituals, and ceremonies. My lineage did indeed focus beyond the basic goal of self-defense, due to the deep Taoist and Buddhist roots of my teachers. I was not quite aware of this before my first introductions, but I would soon learn that most martial arts systems are indeed rooted in having a series of initiations or tests, designed to bring an individual at least from being physically and mentally weak to that of enhanced physical and mental strength, and for those interested in cultivating higher spiritual awareness. I too have sought out rough initiations or “voluntary suffering” in what I would later learn to be called strategic trauma. Intense exercise, meditation, fasting, sensory deprivation, isolation and other methods of self-cultivation can be considered types of self-induced strategic trauma. “Iron palm” training is one such method of self-induced trauma that I did willfully partake in. Mental, physical and self-awareness benefits can be achieved from skillfully hitting bags of dried beans, and then applying medicinal herbs and acupressure techniques thereafter to promote healing. I think when others recognize an individual for having accepted these challenges either on their own volition or with the guidance, encouragement, and assistance from others, these events are now transformed into initiations. We as a group, consisting of my teachers, peers, and later my students under my guidance, did heavily invest in Weller’s five variables of initiations that are the same used to heal individual trauma. These variables are community, ritual, the sacred, time and place. These components can help stabilize and anchor our inner dialogue, when either coping with traumatic life-changing events or self-cultivation.

Iron Palm – Jing Well Acupressure lecture

References:

Writings. (n.d.). Francis Weller. https://www.francisweller.net/writings.html

Hewitt, D. (2021, November 27). 18 Memorable Coming of Age Rituals from History. History Collection. https://historycollection.com/18-memorable-coming-of-age-rituals-from-history/

__________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

]]>
[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care human behavior initiations iron palm martial arts center for health meaning and purpose osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong rites of passage stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Rough-Initiations-Rites-of-Passage Sat, 30 Dec 2023 05:00:00 GMT
The 12 Steps of the Hero’s Journey – Why is this relative to us? https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/The-12-Steps-of-the-Hero-s-Journey-Why-is-this-relative-to-us The concept of the “Hero’s Journey” comes from Joseph Campbell who was a writer, mythologist, and lecturer. Campbell introduced this idea in his book “The Hero with a Thousand Faces,” which was published in 1949. The theme underlying in the Hero’s Journey is that many myths, stories and legends, from differing cultures throughout the world and throughout history follow a similar pattern or structure. Psychologist Carl Jung referred to this innate relationship as the collective unconscious. The Hero’s Journey consists of roughly 12 distinct stages for a “chosen one” to navigate. Specific details may vary from culture to culture, but the overall structure remains fairly consistent. Examples would be that of Gilgamesh (Sumerian/Babylonian Mythology), King Arthur (Arthurian Legends), The Odyssey and Jason and the Argonauts (Greek Mythology), The Ramayana (Hindu Mythology), Sun Wukong (Journey to the West – Chinese Mythology), Inanna’s Descent to the Underworld (Sumerian Mythology), and Siegfried, the dragon slayer (Germanic mythology).

This structure of storytelling has also been popularized by modern authors of books and movies such as Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, The Hunger Games and maybe most widely known of “Star Wars“. George Lucas of Star Wars was inspired by Campbell’s writings, but the two did not meet until well after Lucas had already produced his famous movies. I think that if we look carefully and reflect inward, we may be able to also see the pattern of the hero’s journey in each of our own lives. Why is this important? Because seeing our lives from this perspective can help to add clarity and focus to the unique meaning and purpose that we all possess but are not always aware of.

I find Sam Keen and Anne Valley Fox’s Your Mythic Journey published in 1973, to be quite relevant to current cultural and societal issues. Specifically, that of myths being defined as lies or something opposite of being factual. I too used to think of myths as lies or mere stories to entertain us, until becoming educated otherwise to this stigma. Keen elaborates that myths are a strict set of interconnected stories, customs, rituals, and rites, that serve to inform us while providing a sense of meaning, purpose, and direction to an individual, a family, a community, or culture. Keen expresses that telling of myths, ancient as well as modern have fallen to the wayside due to advances in technologies and the evolution of cultures and societies. When particular things can be seen as “good,” there is always the other opposite or contrasting perspective of there existing some amount of “bad.” While technology might be a factor in people choosing to not write their stories down as much as in years ago or choose to commit them to memory, because they know that they can always just go look them up on the internet. The other side of this coin is that modern technology has opened up the ability for more people to access other nations’ information bases and various cultures’ stories, myths, and knowledge, literally from the comfort and convenience of their own homes. In years past if someone cared to pursue learning about a particular culture, they might very well be best informed if they were to travel across the oceans to find a source that was willing to share. Today we just pick up our smartphone to travel in our thoughts to the other side of the world.

I have been immersed in a Taoist lifestyle for over 40 years, both from my martial arts and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) background and study of this philosophy. With this in mind, I am drawn to see the yin and yang or the balance and contrast, in all things. This concept of yin and yang dates back thousands of years where Taoism has its origins around 500 BCE. Perhaps Taoism came about from the passing of myths to one another, or some myths may have come about from those having studied Taoism. Or maybe both are true, a debate for another discussion. Keen’s words have yin and yang written deep throughout them, as he hints that the contrast between heroes and enemies, is what gives meaning to either side.

Keen later goes on to speak of the inner voices of our ancestors and those around us, that often run through our minds. I have come to know this as our inner dialogue, and when not in check, referred to as the “monkey mind” that is constantly and incessantly jumping from one thought or story to another. Organizing our stories and our myths in our own mind is the challenge. These stories can offer us purpose and meaning to each of us in our own individual and unique ways in spite of standing on the shoulders of those who came before us with their stories and myths. Current popular culture in the US seems somewhat focused upon people needing to come to some realization of “their truth” as opposed to what Keen speaks of as “their story.” Can various different people having the same experience have different truths? I think not, but they can definitely have different stories of their own unique experience. An underlying theme that Keen speaks of is the need for someone to stand in the shoes of another, if they are to truly understand another’s story, whether in their myths, culture, traditions, symbols, etc.

I find Keen’s comments about how few people really know the depth of their own thoughts and imaginations quite accurate. I see more people concerned with what is going on within the virtual computer-generated and online social worlds outside of themselves, rather than understanding what is happening within their own minds. Some people can claim to know about driving a race car in virtual reality when they actually only know how to drive a standard vehicle in the physical world. Learning to understand and differentiate our public and private selves or “discovering our many selves” as Keen states, is a bit of foreshadowing of what I read later as some strong Carl Jung influences of personas, and archetypes as well as Sigmund Freud’s concepts of the id and ego.

The 12 steps of the hero’s journey:

  1. The Ordinary World
    The hero, uneasy, uncomfortable or unaware, is introduced sympathetically so the audience can identify with the situation or dilemma. The hero is shown against a background of environment, heredity, and personal history. Some kind of polarity in the hero’s life is pulling in different directions and causing stress.
  2. The call to adventure
    Something shakes up the situation, either from external pressures or from something rising up from deep within, so the hero must face the beginnings of change.
  3. Refusal of the call
    The hero feels the fear of the unknown and tries to turn away from the adventure, however briefly. Alternately, another character may express the uncertainty and danger ahead.
  4. Meeting with the mentor
    The hero comes across a seasoned traveler of the worlds who gives him or her training, equipment, or advice that will help on the journey. Or the hero reaches within to a source of courage and wisdom.
  5. Crossing the threshold
    At the end of Act One, the hero commits to leaving the Ordinary World and entering a new region or condition with unfamiliar rules and values.
  6. Tests, allies, and enemies
    The hero is tested and sorts out allegiances in the Special World.
  7. Approach
    The hero and newfound allies prepare for the major challenge in the Special world.
  8. The ordeal
    Near the middle of the story, the hero enters a central space in the Special World and confronts death or faces his or her greatest fear. Out of the moment of death comes a new life.
  9. The reward
    The hero takes possession of the treasure won by facing death. There may be celebration, but there is also danger of losing the treasure again.
  10. The road back
    About three-fourths of the way through the story, the hero is driven to complete the adventure, leaving the Special World to be sure the treasure is brought home. Often a chase scene signals the urgency and danger of the mission.
  11. The resurrection
    At the climax, the hero is severely tested once more on the threshold of home. He or she is purified by a last sacrifice, another moment of death and rebirth, but on a higher and more complete level. By the hero’s action, the polarities that were in conflict at the beginning are finally resolved.
  12. Return with the elixir
    The hero returns home or continues the journey, bearing some element of the treasure that has the power to transform the world as the hero has been transformed.

I feel that we are all pursuing a hero’s journey on some level as we all manage and cope with our daily trials and tribulations. However, it is up to the individual to reach some inner clarity and cultivation of character to better understand how this concept applies to their story.

References:

Campbell, J. (1949). The hero with a thousand faces. Pantheon Books.

Keen, S. (1989). Your Mythic Journey: Finding Meaning in Your Life Through Writing and Storytelling. TarcherPerigee.

____________________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

]]>
[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care martial arts center for health osteoporosis parkinsons disease philosophical concepts ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/The-12-Steps-of-the-Hero-s-Journey-Why-is-this-relative-to-us Wed, 27 Dec 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Purpose and Meaning – From Chaos to Calling, Discovering Your Reason for Being https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Purpose-and-Meaning-From-Chaos-to-Calling-Discovering-Your-Reason-for-Being

Ikigai is the Japanese term for striving to achieve a balance of differing concepts of purpose, meaning, self-awareness and self-realization (I will use the acronym of PMSS), while also being able to earn a living from occupations that are rooted in these concepts. Other names for this concept may be finding one’s bliss, calling or inner genius. These four concepts of PMSS are similar, albeit different in their definitions. When we have these components within are psyche, we have a reason to be, a reason to get up out of bed each day, a direction that we can see will benefit our lives and those around us. Without these components, we see chaos, confusion, pain and suffering. Some do know and realize their purpose early in life, although most do not. Many Americans seem to have lost their sense of purpose and meaning. Some may never have known their purpose in the first place, let alone later in their lives. We often see retirees having a loss of purpose once they step away from careers that mostly defined who they were in the workplace, at their homes and within the family hierarchy. Some lose their purpose when a spouse or loved one passes away. Some people in these latter categories, look to volunteering and public service as ways to revive their meaning and purpose. Gaining as understanding of these concepts sooner than later is better not just for the individual, but communities and society as a whole. This sense of PMSS is not something that one can purchase at a store or read about and determine from first thoughts or insights on this topic, as time, life experiences, desire and self-reflection all help to shape one’s PMSS.

Each of the elements of PMSS can offer philosophical and psychological aspects. Here are some summaries of each:

  1. Purpose:
    • Purpose refers to the reason why something exists or is done, the desired outcome or the intention behind an action.
    • In the context of having a purpose, personal purpose involves a person having an understanding of their reason for being, and what gives their life a sense of drive and direction.
  2. Meaning:
    • Meaning is the worth, value or significance that a particular thing holds, often determined from the influence, connection or impact that it has on other things in its surroundings.
    • In the context of having a personal meaning, this concept is the relative awareness, understanding and interpretation of one’s own experiences, actions, and relationships, that influence an individual’s sense of usefulness, satisfaction and fulfillment.
  3. Self-Awareness:
    • Self-awareness is the conscious knowledge of an individual’s own being, which may includes one’s own character, emotions, desires and intents, usually involving one’s ability to reflect upon oneself in order to better understand one’s own thoughts and behaviors.
    • In the Context of having a personal self-awareness, this concept would involve recognizing and acknowledging personal strengths, weaknesses, values, desires, and aspirations.
  4. Self-Realization:
    • Self-realization is the process of pursuing one’s full potential by becoming the best version of oneself, while also achieving a state of personal actualization and fulfillment.
    • In the context of pursuing self-realization, this is closely related to finding and living in harmony with one’s purpose and meaning through one’s life experiences, often including cultivation of personal growth, self-discovery, and the pursuit of authenticity.

In summary, purpose and meaning are key components to achieving self-awareness and self-realization. Developing a better sense of self-awareness can lead to a better understanding of one’s purpose. Self-realization involves the continuous process of living in harmony with that purpose, while finding meaning in one’s life journey. These four different concepts are interconnected and deeply individual, often shaped by one’s own individual experiences, values, and beliefs. Practices such as meditation, yoga, qigong, tai chi and others can often help serve as a conduit to a better understanding of how one’s mind, body and self-awareness are interconnected.

__________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

]]>
[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care human behavior ikigai martial arts center for health osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Purpose-and-Meaning-From-Chaos-to-Calling-Discovering-Your-Reason-for-Being Sat, 23 Dec 2023 05:00:00 GMT
What Are The Key Elements to Happiness? A Harvard Study Adds Insights https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/What-Are-The-Key-Elements-to-Happiness-A-Harvard-Study-Adds-Insights Having a loving family, supportive friends, good health, and having a sense of purpose, are these not what are truly at the root of most people’s happiness? So, then why do we struggle so much to find our happiness through other means, when we know the answer is found in what I have already mentioned? I think many people are in a state of what is currently a popular term of cognitive dissonance, or a inner mental conflict of knowing what is true but choose to believe and behave otherwise to the facts. Most of us know that happiness comes from within, but still look to find it or buy it at some retail store or car dealer down the road. Americans’ happiness has been in a state of decline for many decades now, where many people have a lack of faith or spirituality, have less sense of purpose/meaning, less deeper connections to family and friends, and even less loyalty and pride in the workplace. Many people prefer living a false reality through social media or interactions entirely through the internet. Open your eyes and take an honest look around and see where we are truly residing. However, there is hope though. We just need to do the work. Read further below.

The Harvard Study of Adult Development (aka the Grant/Glueck Study) is an ongoing longitudinal study having started in 1938 with 724 men, with women added in some years later. The goal of the study was to track the participants’ physical and mental health, along with their social and emotional interactions and development over the span of their lives. Now 80 years later, the study is still offering insights into what are the key elements that participants found to have provided happiness throughout their lives. The original study began with a group of 268 Harvard sophomore men, and then later expanded to include a second cohort of 456 inner-city young men from Boston. Many of the men from both groups would go off to fight in WWII, where consequently not all of the soldiers were able to return back home alive.

Key findings:

  • Relationships are key to happiness and well-being. Individuals who pursue and maintain strong social ties are more often happier and healthier than those who are more isolated.
  • Mental and physical health are synergistically entwined. People with good mental health are more prone to be in good physical condition.
  • Stress management is essential for long term health and wellness. Having healthy coping mechanisms helps with better health and longevity.
  • No “one size fits all” approach worked for all. Everyone is uniquely individual in how certain aspects or behaviors of health maintenance may work for some but not necessarily others.
  • Expression and experiencing of positive emotions. Emotions and expressions of gratitude, thankfulness, compassion and empathy are thought to heavily influence health and happiness.

And there it is, some scientific data that has been tracked and passed the test of time. Maybe nothing revolutionary is found in the study, that we often take for granted every day. Family, friends, good health, and a sense of purpose and/or faith in something greater than the individual. All is really needed is the desire, effort and time to make these key elements a reality to the user. Start or join an in-person club or group, call or visit friends and loved ones, mend broken relationships, volunteer, spark new conversations and relationships where appropriate. Get moving! Walk, run, swim, yoga, tai chi, hike. Get your blood moving. Try to be at least 51% positive, as much as possible. Find the things that make you want to wake up every day and get out of the bed, the house, your head. There is a whole world out there that you can be part of and not just an observer from a distance.

Reference:

Msudlifemed. (2019, February 16). Harvard Study of Adult Development- Relationships, Resilience, and Happiness (Healthy Aging). MSU Denver Lifestyle Medicine Resource Hub. https://msudlifemed.wordpress.com/2019/02/16/harvard-study-of-adult-development-relationships-resilience-and-happiness/

___________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

]]>
[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression happiness health care human behavior martial arts center for health osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/What-Are-The-Key-Elements-to-Happiness-A-Harvard-Study-Adds-Insights Wed, 20 Dec 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Gratitude Attitude https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Gratitude-Attitude

The holidays often provide us a reminder for us to be grateful for we have within our lives, as well as what we don’t have. Shouldn’t we try to be grateful though, regardless of what time of the year it is?

We all live a certain amount of time, which will be different for everyone, where we engage and/or are exposed to a large amount of happiness as well as sadness in our lives. Good times as well as bad times, or maybe looked at as a constant ebb and flow of peaks and valleys. I feel that I have a high amount of gratitude for my life, for which I equate to having come to my own realization for what is most important in my life. These things being my own gifts of my mind, body, and spirit along with those family and friends that share in my life. I think as we all become older these things become more apparent and of higher priority as we may realize that time is somewhat limited. Consequently, my mindfulness strategy is to strive to maintain these factors with the goal of not having regrets for not doing so, when it is my eventual time to pass onto the next phase of whatever comes hereafter.  With consistent daily practice of methods such as the “loving-kindness,” “living deeply” and “embracing life” focused meditations, I feel confident in increasing my level of gratitude that I express as well as experience.

I think it does help quite a bit to understand the psychophysiology that affects our mind and body as we process gratitude. I have come to understand that all emotions elicit a response from particular areas of the brain and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and more specifically the limbic system and relative components of the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, and the hypothalamus. These regulatory mechanisms of the ANS produce a variety of appearance changes that are related to specific emotions, such as reactions of skin coloration, moisture and secretions, protrusions, and appearance of eyes (Cacioppo & Tassinary, 2016, p.448). I think that gratitude is perceived as a more positive emotion like joy or happiness, rather than a negative or threat-reactive emotion like fear or anger. I would then propose that an individual experiencing gratitude would also simultaneously experience their pupils constricting, facial reddening, dryness of the palmar regions of the hands and soles of the feet, tears secretion and perhaps lack or increase in piloerection as these are all functions of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) in reciprocity with the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) (Cacioppo & Tassinary, 2016, p.455).

A 2022 study published in the Nephrology Nursing Journal reports on how nurses that care for sufferers of chronic kidney disease (CKD), are often highly emotionally stressed and often themselves suffer health issues of burnout. Researchers in Canada hoped to recruit up to 35 nephrology nurses to participate, but eventually had 13 with 12 nurses actually completing the study program. Nurse participants needed to work in an academic urban regional renal care program, of which were at 10 hospital-based facilities and one at a community-based facility. Participants were recruited via emails, posters, and educational in-services. Nurses were required to be of at least 18 years of age or older, speak English, and work within the renal care program. Anyone that was experiencing untreated severe depression/mental health illness was to be excluded from participating in this study. Once having attended a brief screening process, volunteers that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria were given a letter of information and asked to provide their signed, informed consent. The nurses had agreed to participate in an 8-week Mindful Self-compassion (MSC) research-tested program that integrated the skills of mindfulness, with the intent of practicing specific methods they would cultivate skills in self-compassion to nurture self-kindness, a better sense of common humanity, and mindfulness where they could better manage difficult thoughts in a more balanced perspective instead of reacting with an avoidance or fight/flight response. For each of the 8 weeks a different theme was focused upon. The first week was aimed at discovering mindful self-compassion, the second week was practicing mindfulness, the third week was practice Loving-Kindness meditations and so on, where week eight focused upon embracing your life. The last week was highly important in that along with the culmination of the study, participants were educated on ways to cultivate gratitude, self-appreciation, and happiness.  Also, they learned ways to transform one’s mind’s away from natural negativity bias, while actively embracing the negative and positive aspects within one’s life and inner self. At the end of the study, researchers reported that the participating nurses’ self-compassion scores increased with a statistically significant difference between the before and immediately after intervention time points. Similar improvements were reported in the self-kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness aspects, where self-judgment, isolation, and over-identification had decreased (Crandall et al., 2022).

A way to practice gratitude is to write a letter to one’s younger self. This can help to put into perspective what we as individuals have accomplished, while knowing there is more work to be done. As we write this letter we can contemplate if we will ultimately become either a warning or an inspiration to those in our lives and around our presence. I believe that if we take time to look at ourselves from this perspective, we can actually change our beliefs, views, actions and consequently our emotions as we move forward.

References:

Cacioppo, J. T., Tassinary, L. G., & Berntson, G. G. (2016). Handbook of Psychophysiology. Pgs. 448, 455. Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition.

Crandall, J., Harwood, L., Wilson, B., & Morano, C. (2022). Mindful Self-Compassion Training and Nephrology Nurses’ Self-Reported Levels of Self-Compassion, Burnout, and Resilience: A Mixed Methods Study. Nephrology Nursing Journal, 49(5), 405–417. https://doi.org/10.37526/1526-744x.2022.49.5.405

____________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

]]>
[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care holistic martial arts center for health osteoporosis parkinsons disease psychophysiology ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Gratitude-Attitude Sat, 16 Dec 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Ayahuasca, literally means “the vine of death” https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Ayahuasca-literally-means-the-vine-of-death Ayahuasca usage in Amazonian cultures as a method of healing, has been more widely documented in more recent years. Ayahuasca has been very popular and widespread among indigenous people in South America, having much usage among Amazonian cultures as a way to promote community bonds within interethnic festivals, serving as an initiation or rite of passage from childhood to adulthood, as a religious sacrament, and also as a spiritual teacher plant to increase self-awareness. Various traditional medicines that include plants containing psychoactive constituents, such as Ayahuasca, are becoming more popular throughout the world. Ayahuasca, whose name means “the vine of death” contains N-dimethyltryptamine or DMT (Santos-Longhurst, 2022). This is an appropriate name, due to indigenous people’s use of Ayahuasca in order to achieve spiritual awakening where in the ritualistic ceremony. A participant may face in their mind the loss of everything that they consider important, such as their identity, their body, their health, their loved ones and perhaps even their old belief systems. How they were supposed to be, supposed to live, who they were supposed to love, and how they were supposed to forgive one another, all may become more apparent as the participant’s mind and body process the powerful psychedelic. This ceremony has three important components with the first being the setting, such as within the Amazon Rainforest, the second being the shaman master conducting the ceremony and third the ayahuasca plant and other relative constituents of the concoction to be consumed (Collective Awakening, 2017b).

While the documentary, Collective Awakening talks mostly about the positive aspects of Ayahuasca, I feel it is important to comment on other issues relative to its use. I have found other research on my part that warrants more discussion. Thousands of Westerners (I personally know a few) travel to Amazonian regions every year to pursue spiritual enlightenment and healing of physical as well as psychological ailments. With the more recent globalization of Ayahuasca, there has been a growing assimilation of the ritualistic settings, where the ceremony used to be more respective of its original context. As traditional healing methods grow in popularity, novelty and consequently more integration into Western culture, I feel there needs to be more intense scrutiny into the distribution, use and possible regulation within the US and other countries. This has already been occurring, as more scientists have been increasing their study of Ayahuasca for its potential therapeutic and long-term effects and benefits for fields of neuropsychiatric and neuropharmacology. Research has found encouraging results for mental health issues such as depression, grief, post-traumatic stress disorder, drug dependency, and eating disorders (Bouso & Sanchez-Aviles, 2020).

Living here in Orlando, Florida makes me a bit more sensitive to this topic of Ayahuasca usage going mainstream. A few years back there was a death here, related to a seemingly “alternative church ceremony” and its use and administering of Ayahuasca. The church was not held as legally liable for the death of a 22-year-old man who was a participant (Ray, 2019). My concern is that the ceremony, its meaning, and its purity will become diluted as all of these factors often come into play with the Westernization of traditional medicine modalities.

References:

Collective Awakening. (2017, February 8). Amazonia – Ayahuasca Documentary [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XC1fcMplVWc

Bouso, J. C., & Sanchez-Aviles, C. (2020). Traditional Healing Practices Involving Psychoactive Plants and the Global Mental Health Agenda: Opportunities, Pitfalls, and Challenges in the “Right to Science” Framework. Health and Human Rights, 22(1), 145–150. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26923481

Santos-Longhurst, A. (2022, July 13). Everything You Need to Know About DMT, the ‘Spirit Molecule.’ Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/health/what-is-dmt

Ray, K. (2019, November 23). No charges after death investigation at ayahuasca church. WFTV. https://www.wftv.com/news/9-investigates/no-charges-after-death-investigation-at-ayahuasca-church/852255976/

______________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

]]>
[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease phytotherapy-herbology psychedelics ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Ayahuasca-literally-means-the-vine-of-death Wed, 13 Dec 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Managing Our Inner Dialogue https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Managing-Our-Inner-Dialogue Ancient philosophies and belief systems of Buddhism and Taoism have long understood a state of consciousness of mind wandering, however referring to it as the “monkey mind.” This term is quite appropriate as it defines a state of one’s thoughts jumping from one thought to the next, as a monkey can jump from one tree to the next. William James, the founder of psychology in the United States coined the term “the stream of consciousness.” He saw our thoughts similar to a film reel, where we have individual thoughts that linked together in a sequence to form somewhat of a moving story or movie in our minds. The story moves or “streams” as we are constantly moving from one thought to the next as we process external and internal stimuli. William James theorized that human consciousness does not occur in bits or fragmented segments but rather flows more like a river, or a stream of consciousness. (Benjamin, 2018).

Our inner dialogue consist of basically two separate modes of awake thought processing and associated cognitive brain functions. The first mode of the brain is called the default mode network (DMN), the turbid mind, the incessant inner dialogue, or the monkey mind. In this mode we occupy 50-80 percent of our time with this wandering attention, juggling about 150 undone tasks at any particular time. When we perform mundane tasks, such as getting dressed, taking a shower, brushing our teeth, driving to work, or maybe jogging around the block, our mind is often wandering elsewhere. Our brain is not really focusing much on the physical task at hand but rather thinking of other issues or events elsewhere. We sometimes refer to this as multitasking. Our mind is constantly wandering in and out of the past, present, and future. Becoming and staying focused on specific tasks is a large challenge for the human brain.

The second mode of the awake brain is the task positive network (TPN) or focused mode (Dal Lin et al., 2015). Focused mode is engaged when we are actively paying attention, in the present moment, or concentrating upon tasks using short-term memory, as the brain processes information deemed as very important, interesting, or even sometimes dangerous. For example, if you are engaged in an interesting movie, you may not notice time passing by because your thoughts are focused on what is happening in the movie. If one’s life was to be threatened by a venomous snake, they might become extremely focused upon not moving too quickly, while also keeping their focus on the movement of that snake. Playing a musical instrument, riding a bike, taking a test, or using a knife while cooking are other examples of using this first mode of the brain – focused mode. We often enjoying being in this mode, in spite of not spending the majority of our time here. However, too much time in focus mode left unchecked, can often lead to stress and relative psychological and physiological disorders.

So, how can we better manage and deliberately engage the mode of our choosing? The first step is understanding that we are exposed to various types of stimuli at any given movement. Stimuli comes to us in differing amounts through either external or internal sources. Stimuli is received through our primary sense organs of the eyes, ears, nose, tongue and touch receptors throughout skin on the entire body. Internal stimuli is received through baroreceptors as well as pain, temperature and other types of receptors that tell us when we are hungry, thirsty, and off balance. Often this input manifests into various emotions, whether deemed as positive or negative in their nature.

Psychologist George Miller proposed his theory in his 1956 paper entitled The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on our Capacity for Processing Information, that the human brain’s short-term or working memory (STM) has an upper limit referred to as the “magical number seven.” Miller’s paper detailed his theoretical description of how STM brain might be capable of managing 7 objects, or bits of information.  However, the upper limit could be as many as 9 or as little as 5. Miller’s article reported that memory span is not limited by small bits of information, but rather limited by that of a few bits of information grouped together, or “chunks” (p. 349). Cowan (2015) wrote a review of Miller’s (1956) article titled George Miller’s Magical Number of Immediate Memory in Retrospect: Observations on the Faltering Progression of Science. Years after Miller’s paper, Cowan and Baddeley conducted their own studies on human memory and information processing, where both surmised that the real magic number is actually four and not seven. This concept of the limits of STM affect everyday tasks and interactions, ranging from reading menus on a website, driving a vehicle, and even holding a conversation with one another.

If we can deliberately choose to occupy our thoughts with stimuli that engages our short-term memory along with our breath and physical body alignments and sometimes movement, we can actually learn to better manage our thoughts and emotions. The physical body is a conduit into understanding our mind. The mind is tasked with directing and protecting the body. Conversely, the body protects the user’s mind. Yoga and its sibling of qigong, and its offspring of tai chi, offer many options of sitting, standing and moving exercises that can help to move the practitioner into a meditative state of mind that can help to tame our incessant inner dialogue. Other methods that can engage this cognitive process of managing thoughts can be playing instruments, gardening, and other skillful means however, not all offer the same benefits such as the physical health benefits of yoga, qigong and tai chi.

References:

Benjamin, T., Jr. (2018). A Brief History of Modern Psychology. Wiley.

Cowan, N. (2015). George Miller’s magical number of immediate memory in retrospect: Observations on the faltering progression of science. Psychological Review122(3), 536–541. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0039035

Miller, G. A. (1956). The magical number seven, plus or minus two: Some limits on our capacity for processing information. Psychological Review63(2), 81–97. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1037/h0043158

____________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care human behavior martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Managing-Our-Inner-Dialogue Sat, 09 Dec 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Whole Health Wisdom: Navigating Holistic Wellness (my new book) https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Whole-Health-Wisdom-Navigating-Holistic-Wellness-my-new-book What we think, what we eat and how we move our bodies are the basic components that determine our health and happiness. We all know this, but how do we go about making our lives what we want them to be? Knowledge. Knowledge indeed gives us power to succeed in any endeavor. Knowledge unused is wasted.

I just recently finished up my 26th book in my series on mind, body and self-awareness, titled Whole Health Wisdom: Navigating Holistic Wellness. I formatted this book mostly as an outline, in order to best present the multitude of topics that encompass holistic health and wellness. Each topic could be a separate book unto itself. It is now available for purchase on Amazon https://a.co/d/gcRDJbg with a paperback and Kindle format. However the Kindle version does not look as well formatted as the paperback version. I have at least a few more book topics in my pipeline, as I have tried to publish about one per year more recently.

Book 26 draws upon my over 40 years of learning, practicing and teaching, with the goal of helping others to unlock the key components of holistic health by discovering a life of balance, vitality, and well-being. In this comprehensive outline, you’ll embark on a transformative journey that explores the profound connections between mind, body, and spirit. From ancient healing traditions to modern wellness practices, gain insights into nutrition, healthcare modalities, mindfulness, and the power of belief systems. This outline can serve as a “quick” study guide, inspiring further research, and discussion. Teachers and students alike who are seeking to embrace holistic living as a path to achieving lasting health, happiness, longevity, fulfillment, meaning and a sense of purpose can benefit from this outline.



I included many of my detailed color graphics towards the back-half, that I feel connect strongly to the topics covered in my outline. Specifically, the graphics offer insights and exercises relative to self-regulation of the nervous system, through deliberate management of thoughts, emotions and relative physiological responses by way of respiration and physical body postures. Included are also detailed illustrations of many qigong exercises such as the 8 Pieces of Brocade, Opening & filling of the 8 Vessels (Ship Pal Gye), bottle and weight exercises as well as the Yang 24 tai chi set along with history and physiology. Just below is watermarked copy of new book for those who care to review its contents.

whole-health-wisdom-outline-12-03-2023-watermarked-copy-compressedDownload

______________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga).

I look forward to further sharing more of my message by partnering with hospitals, wellness centers, VA centers, schools on all levels, businesses and individuals that see the value in building a stronger nation through building a healthier population. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

]]>
[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease promotional ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Whole-Health-Wisdom-Navigating-Holistic-Wellness-my-new-book Wed, 06 Dec 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Physically close, mentally far; physically far, mentally close. https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Physically-close-mentally-far-physically-far-mentally-close The quality of a relationship can be determined by the overall strength of the mental connection.


“Physically close, mentally far; physically far, mentally close” is a philosophical concept that reflects a paradoxical aspect of human relationships. We can be physically close to others, but still feel mentally distant. Conversely, we may be physically distanced, but still feel mentally close.

The Harvard Study of Adult Development (the Grant/Glueck Study) started in 1938 with 724 men, and women added in later, has been ongoing for 80 years. Key findings of this study were the following:
(a) Relationships are key to happiness and well-being
(b) Mental and physical health are synergistically in twined
(c) Stress management is essential for long term health and wellness
(d) Gratitude is also a key component to living a longer and happier life
(e) No one size fits all” approach, as everyone’s situation is somewhat unique from another

Human relationships are often quite complex, nudging us to recognize the multi-dimensional nature of closeness and connection beyond the limitations of physical space. Further contemplation on this might bring us to a deeper understanding and appreciation for those in our lives.

  1. Proximity:
    • Being physical next to or in close proximity to another, does not necessarily guarantee emotional or intellectual connection. Individuals can be physically close as in the same room, office, vehicle, or sharing the same space, while being distant in their own thoughts, emotions, and deeper understanding of one another.
  2. The Nature of Connection:
    • Authentic connections transcend physical presence. Mental closeness consists of a deeper understanding that can exist regardless of physical distance, focusing upon the importance of not only emotional but also intellectual connections in relationships.
  3. Communication and Understanding:
    • Open and truthful communication and mutual understanding are imperative for genuine closeness. Physical proximity by itself cannot make up for a lack of communication or comprehend of another’s perspectives.
  4. Technology:
    • Recent advancements in technology have increased the options to stay in touch while being physically far apart. Smartphones, computers and other electronic communication tools have enabled more people to be able to maintain relationships across vast distances, demonstrating the ever changing nature of relationships in our world.
  5. Existential Reflection:
    • Our minds are not bound by mere physical constraints as we can transcend the limitations of space if we desire to do so with our relationships.
  6. Emotional Distance:
    • Physical closeness can be seen as a reflection of our geographical location. Mental distance can be a result of emotional barriers. People may find themselves physically close to other, while emotionally distant due to differences of values, morals, opinions, unresolved conflicts, or emotional walls.
  7. Authentic Connections:
    • Authenticity in relationships requires a deeper understanding of shared values, principles, and emotional empathy for meaningful connections.
  8. Temporal Evolution:
    • Relationships most often change and evolve over time. Physical closeness that once nurtured mental proximity can change, where physical distance coexists with either a stronger or weaker mental connection.
    • Physical distance can actually strengthen relationships, because it may cause people to miss and appreciate each other more giving people time to reflect on their relationship and grow closer.

If people strive to have a strong emotional bond where they feel they are supported and deeply understood by each other, their relationship will be strong regardless of the physical proximity between them.

__________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga). I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

]]> [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care human behavior martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/12/Physically-close-mentally-far-physically-far-mentally-close Sat, 02 Dec 2023 07:39:13 GMT Suicide Rates Spike…. Again in the US https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/11/Suicide-Rates-Spike-Again-in-the-US Here I am again, discussing mental health care in the US. The Wall Street Journal just dropped an article reporting that “U.S. Suicides Reached a Record High Last Year.” It doesn’t need to be this way.

I find this so frustrating that we know our nation’s people are in distress, due to many manageable root issues of poor diet, lack of physical activity (sedentary lifestyle), addiction to electronics, lack of patriotism and maybe most important. loss of meaning and purpose in our lives. Most of us know these are major issues, but do we really care enough to make changes that will actually have a lasting effect? Having vast resources in the way of dollars, and throwing more money to healthcare facilities that often prescribe strong pharmaceuticals cannot be the only answer to this problem that has been on the rise for the last decades. As we can see today, these methods are not making much of a dent.

If we continue to only treat the symptoms of mental health issues, such as anxiety, depression, PTSD, etc. we will never truly address the root causes of these ailments.

Here is the link for the Wall Street Journal article:

There are many options that we can implement, we just need to pierce the veil of delusion and fix the root causes of most of our problems. Most start with our youth and never end as they grow into adults. Education and self-discipline are key.

  • Improve the diet in schools. No more crap junk foods at school or at home.
  • Get recess and PE back in the daily school schedule. What good are cramming advanced courses in the schedule when a kid can’t even self-regulate their emotions with some recess and physical activity?
  • Better manage this smartphone, TV, PC internet/gaming addiction. Basic physiology classes explain this is all about our inner chemistry that is way out of balance with all of the dopamine and cortisol rollercoastering up and down, all day long.
  • Give our people a place to be proud of. If people don’t have a home. a community, a city, a nation, what’s the desire to live in these places?
  • Let’s better educate people to have purpose, something that makes us want to get up and out of bed because the world needs each of us in order to become a better place for everyone.
  • Show those that you love and care about, and even those that you don’t, that the world is a better place for them not only for being in it, but being part of it. This gives meaning to someone and their life.

In addition to these root issues being addressed, there are other options for people to try just in order to manage and self-regulate their own stress. Some are absolutely free or available for minimal costs such as:

(1) Education – books, documentaries, libraries, online


(2) Support – from family, friends, local support groups, online, on the phone (dumps oxytocin into the blood flow)


(3) Mindfulness – pursue becoming aware about what you think, how you react, your actions

(4) Meditation – take a break, a walk, listen to calming music, garden, exercise – these are all types of activities that can elicit a meditative state of mind (adjusts serotonin levels in the bloodstream)


(5) Exercise – the conduit to the mind is through the physical body. Physical movement either gets endorphins and dopamine flowing or epinephrine, adrenaline and cortisol if you are running from a tiger. Walk, run, swim, stretch, hike, etc. These are mostly free.

Other methods may have a cost, but are stiller cheaper in the long run than pills, therapy, a trip to the hospital or ultimately to the morgue.

Be well, become healthier, become wiser.

_____

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, stress management, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and Daoyin (yoga). I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care human behavior martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/11/Suicide-Rates-Spike-Again-in-the-US Wed, 29 Nov 2023 06:17:11 GMT
Why is the US Younger Population in Crisis? https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/11/Why-is-the-US-Younger-Population-in-Crisis Well, this did not just happen overnight and for no apparent reason. There are many factors that are leading the US younger population to be experiencing major health issues, such as obesity, diabetes, anxiety, depression, suicide, and other issues, typically considered as adult issues in years past.

Obesity

  • Increased consumption of processed foods and sugary drinks: The rise of fast food, sugary drinks, and processed snacks has contributed to a significant increase in calorie intake and a decrease in nutrient intake among young people.
  • Decreased physical activity: The increased prevalence of sedentary lifestyles, due to factors such as television, video games, and computer use, has led to a decrease in physical activity among young people.
  • Marketing of unhealthy foods: Children and adolescents are bombarded with advertisements for unhealthy foods, which can influence their dietary choices.

Diabetes

  • Genetic predisposition: Type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic component, and a family history of the disease increases the risk of developing it.
  • Obesity: Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes.
  • Unhealthy diet: A diet that is high in processed foods, sugary drinks, and red meat can increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
  • Lack of physical activity: Physical activity helps to control blood sugar levels and can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Anxiety and depression

  • Increased academic pressure: Young people today face a lot of pressure to succeed in school, which can lead to stress and anxiety.
  • Social media: Social media can be a source of both positive and negative social interactions. For some young people, social media can lead to feelings of isolation, inadequacy, and anxiety.
  • Cyber-bullying: Cyber-bullying is a growing problem that can have a serious impact on the mental health of young people.
  • Fear of violence: Young people today are more likely to be exposed to violence, both in their communities and in the media. This exposure can lead to feelings of fear, anxiety, and stress.

Suicide

  • Mental health disorders: Mental health disorders are a major risk factor for suicide.
  • Substance abuse: Substance abuse is another major risk factor for suicide.
  • Exposure to violence: Young people who are exposed to violence are more likely to attempt suicide.
  • Lack of access to mental health care: Many young people who need mental health care do not receive it, which can increase their risk of suicide.

Other issues

  • Sleep deprivation: Young people today are more likely to be sleep deprived, which can lead to a variety of health problems, including obesity, diabetes, anxiety, and depression.
  • Exposure to environmental toxins: Young people are more likely to be exposed to environmental toxins, such as lead and air pollution, which can have a negative impact on their health.
  • Lack of access to healthy food: Many young people do not have access to healthy food, which can lead to a variety of health problems, including obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

These are just some of the factors that are leading the US younger population to be experiencing major health issues. It is important to address these issues in order to promote the health and well-being of young people.

Solutions

  • Put physical education (PE) back into schools as a priority: Young and old people today need physical activity, not just for the body but their brains. Physical activity is known to help reduce and manage obesity, diabetes, anxiety, and depression.
  • Keep the environmental poisons away from the kids: Get the young people off the couch and computer screens and outdoors to get some fresh air and appreciation for the nature that is all around us.
  • Remove the crap junk food from the diet: Young people eat what schools offer, whether healthy or not. Just as they will eat what their parents buy and put in their homes. If adult parents cannot be disciplined themselves to eat healthier, how can we expect the kids to do the same. Lead by example.
  • Be parents to your children, and stop being their friends: DO YOUR JOB! Give your kids love, guidance, direction, compassion and boundaries. Be better advocates for their health and well-being. Plant good seeds, not bad weeds!

___________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care human behavior obesity osteoporosis qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/11/Why-is-the-US-Younger-Population-in-Crisis Sat, 25 Nov 2023 05:00:00 GMT
What is the PERMA-V Model for Flourishing? https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/11/What-is-the-PERMA-V-Model-for-Flourishing

Dr. Martin Seligman, a psychologist and one of the founders of positive psychology, introduced the concept of PERMA as a framework for understanding and cultivating well-being and happiness. PERMA is an acronym that represents five essential elements of a fulfilling and meaningful life. Here’s a brief summary of each component:

  1. Positive Emotions (P): This refers to experiencing and cultivating positive feelings such as joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, and love. Fostering positive emotions is seen as a crucial aspect of overall well-being.
  2. Engagement (E): Also known as “flow,” engagement involves being fully absorbed and immersed in activities that challenge and utilize one’s skills. When individuals are engaged in what they’re doing, they often lose track of time and experience a sense of deep satisfaction.
  3. Relationships (R): Positive social connections and meaningful relationships contribute significantly to well-being. Maintaining healthy and supportive relationships with friends, family, and community fosters a sense of belonging and social support.
  4. Meaning (M): Finding meaning and purpose in life is essential for well-being. This involves understanding one’s strengths and values and using them to contribute to something larger than oneself, whether it be through work, relationships, or other pursuits.
  5. Accomplishment (A): Achieving goals and accomplishments, both big and small, contributes to a sense of competence and mastery. Setting and reaching goals provides a sense of purpose and fulfillment.
  6. Vitality (V): There has been an update to Seligman’s PERMA model, and the “V” for Vitality has been added. This addition expands the model to include physical well-being as a crucial component. Vitality encompasses the importance of a healthy and energized body. It involves paying attention to nutrition, exercise, sleep, and other factors that contribute to physical well-being.

The PERMA-V model suggests that these six elements work together to enhance overall well-being, and individuals can focus on cultivating each aspect in their lives to lead a more flourishing and satisfying existence.

_________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care human behavior martial arts center for health osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi well-being wellness winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/11/What-is-the-PERMA-V-Model-for-Flourishing Wed, 22 Nov 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Flu Season is Really Vitamin D Deficiency Season https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/11/Flu-Season-is-Really-Vitamin-D-Deficiency-Season Yes, it is that time of year again. Become educated, become healthy and be in control of your health and well-being. Nobody else will care more about YOUR health than YOU!

Temperatures drop. People stay inside. Many wear more layers of clothing to stay warm. Those in warmer climates cover their skin to avoid too much sun exposure. For a big chunk of the year, many people do not receive enough sunlight on their skin to produce their own vitamin D. Nationwide vitamin D deficiency overall prevalence rate is 41.6%, with the highest rate seen in blacks (82.1%), followed by Hispanics (69.2%)2.
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21310306/

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a crucial role in several physiological processes, including bone health and immune system function.

Bone Physiology:

  1. Calcium Absorption:
    • Vitamin D is essential for the absorption of calcium from the intestines. Calcium is a critical mineral for bone health, and its absorption is necessary for the development and maintenance of strong and healthy bones.
  2. Bone Mineralization:
    • Vitamin D helps regulate the levels of calcium and phosphorus in the blood, facilitating the mineralization of bone. This process is essential for the formation and maintenance of the bone structure.
  3. Preventing Rickets and Osteomalacia:
    • Severe vitamin D deficiency can lead to conditions such as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. These conditions result in weakened and deformed bones due to impaired mineralization.

Immune System:

  1. Immune Cell Function:
    • Vitamin D has been shown to modulate the function of immune cells, including T cells and macrophages. It helps regulate the immune response, promoting the appropriate response to infections while preventing excessive inflammation.
  2. Antimicrobial Properties:
    • Vitamin D has antimicrobial properties and can enhance the production of antimicrobial peptides. These peptides play a role in the body’s defense against various pathogens, including bacteria and viruses.
  3. Autoimmune Diseases:
    • There is evidence suggesting a link between vitamin D deficiency and an increased risk of autoimmune diseases. Adequate vitamin D levels may help modulate the immune system and reduce the risk of autoimmune conditions.

Sources of Vitamin D:

  1. Sun Exposure:
    • The skin can produce vitamin D when exposed to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation from sunlight. Spending time outdoors and getting sunlight on the skin is a natural way to produce vitamin D.
  2. Dietary Sources:
    • Some foods are good sources of vitamin D, including fatty fish (such as salmon and mackerel), fortified dairy products, fortified cereals, and egg yolks.
  3. Supplements:
    • In cases where it’s challenging to obtain enough vitamin D from sunlight and diet, supplements may be recommended, especially in regions with limited sunlight or for individuals with conditions that affect vitamin D absorption.

Maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D is crucial for both bone health and a well-functioning immune system. It’s important to strike a balance, as both deficiency and excess of vitamin D can have adverse effects on health. If you have concerns about your vitamin D levels, it’s advisable to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized guidance.

_________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health & wellness health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/11/Flu-Season-is-Really-Vitamin-D-Deficiency-Season Sat, 18 Nov 2023 05:00:00 GMT
An Ultra-Processed Diet – we truly “are what we eat” https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/11/An-Ultra-Processed-Diet-we-truly-are-what-we-eat

Most of us were taught a very long time ago, that we truly “are what we eat.” Well here we are decades later and it is quite evident what our population has been eating. Specifically, junk and crap foods that have helped to lead our people to have:

  • Nearly 1 in 3 adults (30.7%) are overweight.
  • More than 1 in 3 men (34.1%) and more than 1 in 4 women (27.5%) are overweight.
  • More than 2 in 5 adults (42.4%) have obesity (including severe obesity).
  • About 1 in 11 adults (9.2%) have severe obesity.
  • Nearly 40% of all adults over the age of 20 in the U.S. – about 93.3 million people – are currently obese.
  • Every state in the U.S. has more than 20% of adults with obesity.
  • The U.S. adult obesity rate stands at 42.4 percent, the first time the national rate has passed the 40 percent mark.
    https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/overweight-obesity

And let’s also note the other issues of:

Maybe now is the right time to re-evaluate what we are putting into our bodies, and more importantly what kids are eating today will determine what type of health they will have later as adults. Plant good seeds, not weeds.

Be well, Get healthy, Be wise.

_________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diet & nutrition health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/11/An-Ultra-Processed-Diet-we-truly-are-what-we-eat Wed, 15 Nov 2023 05:31:52 GMT
Whole Heath Wisdom: Navigating Holistic Wellness https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/Whole-Heath-Wisdom-Navigating-Holistic-Wellness Be well, become healthy, become wiser. You are the architect of your health and happiness!

Holistic wellness encompasses not only physical exercises but proper nutrition, social interactions, self-regulation of stress & emotions and many other facets of well-being. Holistic health practices seem like they are something new, sometimes thanks to savvy marketers looking to ride the next wave of healthcare fads. Ironically, many holistic methods have roots deep in Buddhism, Taoism, Ayurveda, Traditional Chinese Medicine and other ancient cultures from around the world. Phytotherapy (herbology), naturopathy, chiropractic and even biomedicine/allopathic medicine owe these origins to the ancients.

So many people in pain and suffering, that don’t need to be. I am looking forward to partnering with more wellness centers, hospitals, VA facilities, schools, other groups and venues that can see the value in promoting mind, body and self-awareness. Most know that we have been in a mental and physical healthcare crisis, for many decades now.

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, meditation, phytotherapy (herbs), music for healing, self-massage, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) alternative medicine anxiety chronic pain health & wellness health care holistic martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi wellness winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/Whole-Heath-Wisdom-Navigating-Holistic-Wellness Mon, 30 Oct 2023 14:55:36 GMT
Meditation Practices – (the non-pharmaceutical pill you can take today, to ward off your illnes https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/Meditation-Practices-the-non-pharmaceutical-pill-you-can-take-today-to-ward-off-yo I have some observations from practicing and teaching meditation methods from over my last 40 years. There has been much stigma in the US regarding meditation going back to when the Maharishi introduced it to the Beatles rock band from 1959 and into the 60’s, and consequently the whole American counterculture of “hippies” of that era. I was quite young at this time but remember how adults around me would comment on how meditation was religious, cultish, and maybe even related to drug use. Some of these factors may actually be true for some people but definitely don’t need to be. Meditation and its many, many various methods can stand alone from any of my previous mentioned groups. Once people become informed and more educated, then they can logically determine for themselves that meditation is more of a mental type of exercise than anything threatening or unusual. Once someone realizes that meditation can come in many ways other than sitting still for long periods of time, such as playing or listening to music, walking, hiking, cooking, walking, producing artwork and many other skillful means, meditation can become less weird, unusual, or threatening. Moving meditation through yoga, tai chi/qigong, dance, and some others are a great way to get away from the stationary methods of sitting and standing meditation. However, if someone is closed minded to the whole idea of learning and trying something new, then it doesn’t really matter how hard another tries to convince them.

Time is another big deterrent to regular and consistent practice of meditation. Many people have the false assumption that if one is not sitting in the lotus position for hours on end, then they are not meditating or may not be doing it long enough to benefit. Studies have reported that some college students who practice mindfulness as part of their coursework, showed cognitive and wellbeing benefits, even when practicing for as little as five minutes twice a week, depending upon the type of mindfulness method implemented (O’Hare et al., 2023).

I have come to understand that it takes about 3 minutes of regulated slow breathing to engage the parasympathetic nervous system and its relative benefits of slower heart rate which affects metabolic functions, helping to induce stress relief, relaxation, and mental clarity. I have come to call the “foot in the door” approach seems to work best for beginners. This is when I suggest to someone with an interest in trying meditating, to start with using a timer set for 5 minutes. Almost everyone can agree that 5 minutes is quite easy to carve out and into one’s schedule. Often after the 5 minutes goes by relatively quicky and without incident, a beginner can easily add another 5 minutes, and then another of they feel better from the initial starting. Our mind has this interesting ability to adjust our perspectives on time and relative priorities as our thoughts and emotions level off to see what truly is more important.

Other challenges that I have encountered either with myself or others are physical discomfort, inability to relax and/or quiet the mind, boredom and even some people become so relaxed that they fall asleep. Practice, practice and more practice. Meditation is a slow path to a greater reward, that will pay off over time of the effort is invested. If you were to eat a salad once a month, this will not make you healthy. Similarly, meditating once in a while will not yield much results. Slow and steady wins the game.

Reference:

O’Hare, A. J., & Gemelli, Z. T. (2023). The effects of short interventions of focused-attention vs. self-compassion mindfulness meditation on undergraduate students: Evidence from self-report, classroom performance, and ERPs. PLoS ONE, 17(1), 1–20. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0278826

Some other tips regarding meditation:

Meditation can offer numerous benefits for mental, emotional, and even physical well-being, but it’s not always an easy practice to master. Common challenges people face with meditation include:

  1. Restlessness and Impatience: Many beginners struggle with restlessness and impatience, finding it difficult to sit still and quiet the mind.
  2. Monkey Mind: This refers to the constant stream of thoughts that can make it hard to concentrate or find a sense of calm during meditation.
  3. Physical Discomfort: Sitting in one position for an extended period can lead to discomfort or even pain, distracting from the meditation experience.
  4. Lack of Time: Finding time to meditate regularly can be a challenge in our busy lives, leading to inconsistency in the practice.
  5. High Expectations: Some people expect immediate results from meditation, leading to disappointment when the benefits don’t manifest right away.
  6. Doubt and Skepticism: It’s common to doubt the effectiveness of meditation, especially if the benefits aren’t immediately apparent.
  7. Boredom: Sitting in silence can sometimes lead to feelings of boredom, making it harder to stay engaged in the practice.
  8. Difficulty Focusing: People often struggle to maintain focus on a single point of attention, such as the breath or a mantra.

To overcome these challenges and improve your meditation practice, consider these recommendations:

  1. Start Small: Begin with shorter meditation sessions and gradually increase the duration as your focus and comfort improve. Even a few minutes of meditation can be beneficial.
  2. Be Patient: Understand that meditation is a skill that takes time to develop. Results may not be immediate, but consistent practice will yield benefits over time.
  3. Accept Thoughts: Instead of trying to forcefully push away thoughts, acknowledge them without judgment and gently bring your focus back to your chosen point of meditation (e.g., your breath).
  4. Use Guided Meditations: Guided meditations, available through apps or online, can provide structure and support, making it easier to stay focused.
  5. Experiment with Techniques: There are various meditation techniques (mindfulness, loving-kindness, body scan, etc.). Experiment with different techniques to find the one that resonates with you.
  6. Create a Routine: Set a regular meditation schedule. Consistency is key to reaping the benefits of meditation.
  7. Adjust Your Posture: If physical discomfort is an issue, try different sitting positions or consider practicing walking meditation to reduce the strain.
  8. Lower Expectations: Approach meditation with an open mind and without lofty expectations. Focus on the process rather than the outcome.
  9. Join a Group: Meditating with a group or participating in meditation classes can provide accountability and a sense of community.
  10. Cultivate Patience: Patience is crucial. Like any skill, meditation improves with time and practice. Be kind to yourself as you navigate the challenges.

Remember that meditation is a personal journey, and everyone’s experience is unique. It’s okay to face challenges along the way; these challenges are often opportunities for growth and learning.

________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

Contact for times, locations and costs.

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care martial arts center for health meditation obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi trauma winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/Meditation-Practices-the-non-pharmaceutical-pill-you-can-take-today-to-ward-off-yo Sat, 28 Oct 2023 09:51:49 GMT
Try to Avoid Being “Triggered” by the Overused Word “Trigger” https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/Try-to-Avoid-Being-Triggered-by-the-Overused-Word-Trigger

“Triggered” has become a more recent buzzword, relative to emotional interoception and self-regulation and use of coping mechanisms. Almost anything can be a perceived trigger to an individual depending upon genetics, upbringing, environment, experiences, etc. Burnt toast may be a trigger to a child or adult, where they express disgust, disappointment, anger and other negative emotions. Loud noises may be a trigger for a soldier experiencing PTSD from combat and relative life and death circumstances. Everyone interprets stimuli uniquely to their own circumstances. However, trigger is not too often being associated with positive scenarios. We don’t hear much of people being “triggered” into helping someone in need, triggered to complete a task, or offer a compliment. Triggered is becoming a bit overused and taking on a negative definition within our culture.

Doctor Erik Messamore speaks in some detail about how the word “trigger” itself can become overused and actually trigger its own negative emotional responses. The word often connects to definitions attached to weapons or a state of lack of control. Once the trigger is pulled or engaged, there is no way to un-pull the trigger (Ask A Psychiatrist, 2020). I have discussed this concept in other venues, where the topic came up about how it is possible to manipulate someone to remember any particular thought. For example, if we were to perform an online Google search asking for “cars other than blue ones” and then click images, all we will see our blue cars presented. So, regardless of us asking for no blue cars, artificial intelligence only picks up on the “blue” with no context of the surrounding words. If we ask a produce worker at the grocery store to find us some unbruised bananas, their attention goes towards finding the bruised ones and not choosing those. Regardless, their thoughts and ours gravitate towards not wanting bruised bananas. Similarly, if we are discussing something that is negative, stressful or triggering, but seemingly not personally affecting us, our words and attached thoughts will on some level affect our emotions and relative psychophysiological responses.

Alternative words instead of using triggering could be:

  • stressors
  • elicit
  • produce
  • bring about
  • manifest
  • cause
  • produce

Psychologist John Cacioppo states that “the processing of a word, like any other sensory stimulus is sensitive to experience,” (Cacioppo & Tassinary, 2016, p.515). I think that this brings us to the understanding that specific areas of the brain play roles in the processing of sensory stimuli which may be perceived as bringing us happiness, stress, or other emotional states in between. While all humans may have the same components within the brain, each person processes stimuli and relative happiness or stress somewhat unique to their own genetics, life circumstances, and behaviors and/or lifestyle choices (DocMikeEvans, 2016). When we choose to speak words, the Wernicke’s area of the brain is engaged to help formulate within our thoughts, what we will verbally say. Neuron signals are then transmitted to the Broca’s area of the brain in order to produce the strategy for the motor cortex to put together the sounds that will become words and sentences. From here we use our language to communicate our thoughts (Andrew Scott, 2013). I think that this process is the result of how each individual perceives stimuli and responds uniquely depending upon their own availability of coping mechanisms, resources, and life experiences. If someone is exposed to mostly negative experiences throughout their life, they may have a different “calibration” for what they perceive as happiness. Conversely, someone who has very little stress in their lives may see themselves as quite happy, until something they perceive as a major stressor forces them to re-calibrate their thinking.

So, I think that happiness and stress are both relative terms to the present moment. Perceptions of happiness and stress will continue to ebb and flow as we learn, grow, and then adapt to whatever we experience under whatever circumstances. Words have meaning, impact and influence. Choose words wisely.

References:

Ask A Psychiatrist. (2020, May 12). Emotion Regulation. What causes emotional reactions and how can we modify them? [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUPIhzHa-68

Cacioppo, J. T., Tassinary, L. G., & Berntson, G. G. (2016). Handbook of Psychophysiology. P. 515. Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition.

DocMikeEvans. (2016, August 18). The science of Subjective Well Being, a.k.a Happiness. [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPbjK3MmjL0

Andrew Scott. (2013, March 24). Broca’s area vs. Wernicke’s area – VCE Psychology [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iHDF5twkcE

_________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

Contact for times, locations and costs.

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care human behavior martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/Try-to-Avoid-Being-Triggered-by-the-Overused-Word-Trigger Mon, 23 Oct 2023 12:31:11 GMT
Self-regulation or “you are the boss of you” https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/Self-regulation-or-you-are-the-boss-of-you So many people complain about national health issues that face our country today. Stress, PTSD, anxiety, depression, diabetes, suicide, obesity and many other ailments have skyrocketed over the last decades. The US spends the most of all nations on healthcare, in spite of ranking way below the top. These issues did not happen overnight and will not be fixed overnight either. If children (and adults too!) were being taught to manage themselves or self-regulate, their stress, their interactions with others – through exercise and breathing management, we would soon not have as many adults in such poor health. Plant good seeds if you want good crops, right? Healthcare is best started with self-care.

Become interested in self-regulating and managing your own health, your stress, your sense of balance. Or maybe just get out of the house and meet some new people. Do something that engages your mind and your body at the same time. Walk, run, swim, hike, garden, play a musical instrument, paint, draw, build or create something,

I prefer self-regulation through exercises from martial arts, yoga/qigong and other similar mind-body methods. Exercises can be practiced while standing, and then moving into yoga-like postures of Tai chi and qigong. By aligning the bones and relative joints, muscles become engaged making both the bones and muscles stronger and consequently more stable. Putting focus on one’s physical body is how one can occupy their mind with positive thoughts rather than the typical chaos, confusion and other negative issues that distract us from enjoying life to its fullest.

1. Self-observation- we look at our behavior and keep tabs on it.

2. Judgement- we compare what we see with a standard.

3. Self-response- if we did well with your standard, you give yourself rewarding self- responses.

___________________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

Contact for times, locations and costs.

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care human behavior martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/Self-regulation-or-you-are-the-boss-of-you Wed, 11 Oct 2023 07:09:39 GMT
Symbolism’s Relationship to Music https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/Symbolism-s-Relationship-to-Music

Symbols can have strong meanings, and for that reason have been used for thousands of years to help convey messages, passing on of history, mythology and philosophical concepts. I have combined some of my thoughts on the relationships between Carl Jung’s ideas on “squaring of the circle,” and its similarities to the Indigenous Medicine Wheel, the 5-elements theory or “wuxi” from Taoism, and the energy center or “chakras” from Hinduism/Buddhism. The Indigenous Medicine Wheel offers the values of humility, honesty, respect, courage, wisdom, truth, and love. Taoism’s star symbol represents other aspects of the mind, will power, intellect, the corporeal and ethereal souls, among other correspondences. The chakra scale has its own set of similar, but different correspondences. The more I delve into the teachings of these ancient cultures, I feel quite strongly that the similarities between them are not mere coincidences, but rather perhaps the underlying collective unconscious presenting itself in various different manifestations, in separate locations and at assorted times in human history.

Aside from overlapping components of colors, elements, animals, energy centers and many others, is the similarity in the musical notes or tones that all of these philosophical and/or belief systems share. Humans have used music for enjoyment, for ritual, for healing and perhaps other reasons for thousands of years. Music is a series of sounds or tones that produce vibrations. These vibrations can affect the human body’s nervous system on many levels, sometimes deemed as being good or bad for the individual. Certain tones are thought to affect specific organs, different levels of self-realization, and links to higher spiritual realms. Conversely, specific notes can vibrate to cause stress on the nervous system, breakup kidney stones and even for demolition of buildings.

I learned many decades ago that the holding of physical postures engages specific muscles group while simultaneously engaging the nervous systems. Either the parasympathetic nervous system (rest and digest response) is engaged with the slow rhythmic breathing or the sympathetic nervous system (fight or flight response) with a rapid rhythmic breathing cadence. Either of these processes can change the blood chemistry to promote healing on different levels. This physiological process can be seen in the other moving meditations practices of yoga, and its offspring of qigong and further spawn of tai chi. I have found (and personally practiced) all of these methods with either slow or fast breathing patterns can put the practitioner in either the meditative or trance state, depending upon background music/sounds, the individual and their intent. This is a concept called entrainment, where the practitioner’s heartbeat synchronizes with the beat of a drum or other percussion sound. I have learned to practice qigong, tai chi and other martial arts exercises with music consisting of bells, chimes and other percussion instruments with this exact purpose of slowing (or increases) the heart and breathing rate in order to enter into the meditative state of being.

With so much talk and debate in recent years regarding anxiety, depression and many other mental ailments, music therapy along with physical and mental exercises, offers realistic, relatively cheap and readily accessible methods for self-regulation of thoughts, emotions and relative physiological mechanisms. Or, in other words self-care of personal health and well-being.

_____________

I teach and offer lectures about holistic health, qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

Contact for times, locations and costs.

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease philosophical concepts ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/Symbolism-s-Relationship-to-Music Thu, 05 Oct 2023 11:54:03 GMT
We are the Architects of our own Health, Happiness, Well-being, Destiny or Fate https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/We-are-the-Architects-of-our-own-Health-Happiness-Well-being-Destiny-or-Fate When we start to realize that we are indeed the architects of our own health, happiness, well-being, destiny or fate, we begin to see things from a quite different perspective.

Wim Hof, listen or don’t. There are many, many others that know that the secret to health and well-being is through modulation of our autonomic nervous system. This is accomplished through self-awareness,and mindfulness of our thoughts that affect emotions that affect blood chemistry that affects organ function and overall quality of health. Not really a secret anymore if everyone can learn of this. Ancient cultures knew of this thousands of years ago. Western medicine is slow to acknowledge this because there is no profit coming from a healthier lifestyle. Most of us know this but deny accepting it – cognitive dissonance; knowing better but just going along with things to acquiescence.

If it was not for me, myself being deeply involved in these practices for over 40 years, I would not believe much of what others say. However, when we delve into what we eat, what we put into and on our bodies, how we think and respond to life, we can see that there is much more to healthcare by way of “self-care.” Do your own due diligence and become aware of you.

Be well, become healthy, become wiser.

And we ALL have access to this knowledge and ability to incorporate it into our lives.

I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

Contact for times, locations and costs.

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health care human behavior martial arts center for health osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/10/We-are-the-Architects-of-our-own-Health-Happiness-Well-being-Destiny-or-Fate Mon, 02 Oct 2023 13:46:02 GMT
Which “Care” do You Invest Upon? https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/9/Which-Care-do-You-Invest-Upon – Healthcare (rely upon others to keep you healthy)

– Self-care (assume control & responsibility for your well-being)

– Other-care (taking care of others more so than yourself)

– I don’t care (live for the moment, no regard for consequences)

__________________________________________________________

Tired of being tired?

Low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, PTSD?

Feel tight, weak or unable to enjoy activities that you used to be able to do?

Are you interested in managing stress, improving balance, while learning low-impact strength and flexibility exercises?

Or maybe just get out of the house and meet some new people.

These particular exercises are done standing, and then moving into yoga-like postures called Tai chi and qigong. By aligning the bones and relative joints, muscles become engaged making both the bones and muscles stronger and consequently more stable. Putting focus on one’s physical body is how one can occupy their mind with positive thoughts rather than the typical chaos, confusion and other negative issues that distract us from enjoying life to its fullest.

I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

Contact for times, locations and costs.

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health & wellness health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/9/Which-Care-do-You-Invest-Upon Mon, 18 Sep 2023 05:54:41 GMT
Mind and Body Exercises – It really is that simple! https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/7/Mind-and-Body-Exercises-It-really-is-that-simple

I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercisesMind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

www.MindAndBodyExercises.comwww.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain class info depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/7/Mind-and-Body-Exercises-It-really-is-that-simple Sat, 29 Jul 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Migraines – Triggered by Bright Light https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/7/Migraines-Triggered-by-Bright-Light Bright light can be a triggering factor for migraine headaches in some individuals. The underlying physiological mechanisms are not fully understood, but several theories have been proposed to explain this relationship.

One theory suggests that the visual cortex, the part of the brain responsible for processing visual information, becomes hyperexcitable during a migraine attack. Bright light, particularly certain wavelengths such as blue light, can stimulate the visual cortex and lead to an overstimulation of the neurons, triggering a migraine episode.

Another theory focuses on the role of the trigeminal nerve, a major cranial nerve involved in migraine pathology. It is believed that exposure to bright light can cause the trigeminal nerve to release certain neuropeptides, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which are known to be involved in migraine pain signaling. The release of these substances may trigger inflammation and dilation of blood vessels in the brain, leading to a migraine headache.

Additionally, people with migraines often have heightened sensitivity to light, a condition known as photophobia. This sensitivity can cause discomfort and pain when exposed to bright light, making it a potential trigger for migraine attacks.

It is important to note that not all individuals with migraines are sensitive to bright light, and triggers can vary widely among individuals. Migraine triggers can also include other factors such as stress, certain foods, hormonal changes, lack of sleep, and environmental factors. Therefore, the relationship between bright light and migraines can be complex and may vary from person to person.

If you experience migraines triggered by bright light, it can be helpful to manage your environment by wearing sunglasses, using tinted lenses, or reducing exposure to bright screens or lights when possible. Consulting with a healthcare professional or a headache specialist can also provide personalized advice and treatment options for managing migraines.

Personally, I have managed headaches for many years varying from migraines, stress-related and triggered from allergies to food and environment. I am not a medical doctor nor claim to be. However, I have found that with the physical and mental practices of qigong/yoga, tai chi, martial arts, meditation and other mind & body practices, I can not only prevent debilitating headaches, but be more self-aware so as not to contribute to the triggering of such ailments. Acupressure has also brought me much benefit for myself as well as my clients as well (see my graphic below).

References:

Bluebird, O. &., & Bluebird, O. &. (2021, May 5). Discovering your migraine triggers with Migraine Buddy – Migraine Buddy. Migraine Buddy – Track Your Headache and Migraine – Find your Triggers and Relief – -Take Control. https://migrainebuddy.com/discovering-your-migraine-triggers-with-migraine-buddy/

Light sensitivity at EVERY stage of a migraine attack. (n.d.). TheraSpecs. https://www.theraspecs.com/blog/light-sensitivity-migraine-attack-stages/

I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain depression diabetes health & wellness health care martial arts center for health migraine obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/7/Migraines-Triggered-by-Bright-Light Wed, 19 Jul 2023 06:18:15 GMT
Become the Diamond, Leave the Coal Behind https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/7/Become-the-Diamond-Leave-the-Coal-Behind Humans are like a lump of coal (or carbon), where if put under enough pressure, we may transform into a diamond. I understand that it takes many years, perhaps millions of years for this transformation to happen. As humans we have only about 70-80’s years on average to make our transformation come about, so best to start as soon as possible. I speak of this diamond metaphorically, in regards to each of us being on our own journey to find purpose and meaning in our lives. The diamond is what emerges from the dark and dirty coal, as we strive to find the inner genius, beauty, perfection and acceptance within our selves.

We all have our own unique set of circumstances with relative trials and tribulations. How we manage these issues are key to our health and happiness. Managing our thoughts, emotions and actions can often be attained from managing our physical body through exercise and deliberate wellness and fitness methods. Qigong (yoga), tai chi, meditation and other methods can offer lifelong benefits to the mind, body and spirit. These practices are paths to become your diamond from the rough of the world.

The process of transforming coal into a diamond takes an incredibly long time—millions to billions of years. Both coal and diamonds are made up of carbon, but the key difference lies in their formation and the conditions under which they are created.

Coal forms from plant material that accumulates in swampy environments over millions of years. Through the process of burial and geological transformation, the organic material undergoes compaction and chemical changes, resulting in the formation of coal. This process typically takes millions of years.

On the other hand, diamonds are formed deep within the Earth’s mantle, where high pressure and temperature conditions exist. These conditions cause carbon atoms to arrange in a crystal lattice structure, forming diamonds. This process occurs at depths of around 150 to 200 kilometers (93 to 124 miles) and requires immense pressure and temperatures of approximately 1,000 to 1,300 degrees Celsius (1,832 to 2,372 degrees Fahrenheit). The time required for diamond formation can range from hundreds of millions to billions of years.

Therefore, the transformation of coal into a diamond is an extremely slow and geologically long process, occurring over millions to billions of years under specific conditions deep within the Earth.

Life is a challenge. Nothing worth achieving comes for free. Gifts and rewards are most valuable when earned. Change your coal into diamonds.

I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease philosophical concepts ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/7/Become-the-Diamond-Leave-the-Coal-Behind Sun, 09 Jul 2023 08:45:35 GMT
Thoughts Can Affect the Immune System https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/7/Thoughts-Can-Affect-the-Immune-System Depression, anxiety, PTSD, OCD, ADHD, suicide, and many other mental ailments are all serious health concerns. And also buzzwords for politicians and media attention that many feel are talked about, but never addressed. If you follow the news and mainstream media you might be led to believe that pharmaceuticals are the only treatment for mental health issues. There seems to be very little discussion regarding use of exercise (recess and PE for kids) and management of stress through breathing techniques. Both of these methods are readily available for free and span socioeconomic factors as well. Most people don’t need much space to walk, run, swim or practice calisthenics exercises. Breathing techniques are easily taught and practiced once someone is educated. A national healthcare system based on lifestyle habits of proper diet and regular exercise would be less expensive that the $4.3 trillion dollars that was spent on “sickcare” in 2021. “Selfcare” teaches people to be responsible for their own health and doesn’t help to bring profits to pharma corps, hospital chains and other facets of the healthcare industrial complex. So what should we do? Become educated to what your health is truly about…and it should not be to make other people wealthy from you not being healthy, well and fit.

The autonomic nervous systems, specifically the sympathetic (SNS, fight or flight) and parasympathetic (PNS, rest and digest) nervous systems play an integral role with the human immune system. The interaction between these two mechanisms is how the human mind and body reacts to everyday stress and sometimes traumatic stressful events.

Emotional states directly influence respiration rate which affect organ function and consequently the immune system’s ability to fight off disease and illness. When our breathing patterns change so does our blood chemistry. Our emotions reveal themselves in various breathing patterns. Emotions of anger, fear, and anxiety result in quick, shallow breaths. Grief causes us to breathe spasmodically. Boredom leads to shallow breathing, while sadness and depression produces shallow and inconsistent breathing.

Stress can be defined as an individual’s consciousness and body’s response to tension or pressure in regard to specific events or changes in one’s environment. Increased breathing rate is necessary when experiencing truly stressful situations, like being chased by an animal, running from a fire or similar life-threatening situations. However, continued breathing at this pace for an extended period of time puts accumulative stress on all of the body’s systems. It is also worth stating that not all stress is considered bad in that good things can arise from experiencing stress and coping with it (Tripathy 2018).This is actually how one can strengthen their own immune system by learning how to manage their own stresses.

Stress has become known as one of the main factors contributing to the top causes of human death. Heart disease, cancer, unintentional accidents, respiratory ailments, cirrhosis of the liver and suicide are the most common causes that all share a strong connection to stress. Deliberate management of the SNS by regulating respiration rate and volume has been proven through medical research to lower stress (Hartz-Seeley 2014).

The average person breathes 12-18 breaths per minute (BPM) during regular activity of standing, sitting & walking, consequently engaging the sympathetic nervous system. Constant duration in the SNS dumps neurotransmitters of cortisol and norepinephrine into the blood stream putting the vital organs in a state of constant high alert and stress which weakens the immune system. Health and fitness experts suggest that 6 BPM is optimal for the lungs to properly oxygenate the whole body, balance the blood chemistry and also remove toxins. The lungs are responsible for removing 70% of the body’s waste by-products through exhalation. Deeper breathing is a key component to having a long and healthy life. Through focused and deliberate breathing methods, many positive mental and physical benefits can be achieved. This is more easily accomplished through mindful breathing patterns from exercises such as meditation, qigong, tai chi and yoga (Russo et al, 2017).

I have been successful in the past decades, in managing my own stress along with accompanying headaches, anxiety, digestive issues, blood pressure levels and other ailments. When and if I begin to feel ill, fatigued or even flu-like symptoms, my course of action is to practice some tai chi and yoga, followed by a healthy meal and a good night’s rest. Based upon all of this information and my own experiences, I definitely think that our immune system is greatly affected by our nutrition, exercise/activities, thought patterns and lifestyle choices.

References:

HARTZ-SEELEY, D. (2014, March 21). Chronic stress is linked to the six leading causes of death. Miami Herald. https://www.miamiherald.com/living/article1961770.html

Tripathy, M. (2018). Recognizing & Handling the Underlying Causes of Stress at Workplace: An Approach through Soft Skills. International Journal of Management, Accounting & Economics, 5(7), 619–632. https://search-ebscohost-com.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=sso&db=buh&AN=131442513&site=eds-live

Russo, M. A., Santarelli, D. M., & O’Rourke, D. (2017). The physiological effects of slow breathing in the healthy human. Breathe (Sheffield, England), 13(4), 298–309. https://doi.org/10.1183/20734735.009817

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I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health care human behavior martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/7/Thoughts-Can-Affect-the-Immune-System Sat, 01 Jul 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Unhealthy Healthcare Providers – An Irony That Needs to Change https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Unhealthy-Healthcare-Providers-An-Irony-That-Needs-to-Change It is way past the time to take off the blinders and see US healthcare for what it is – SICKCARE

There has been a slow, albeit deliberate evolution of America becoming a cult(ure) of pharmacology as our main healthcare system. Long ago are the days where Americans strived to be well, fit and overall healthy regardless of occasionally becoming sick or ill. Today it is widely acceptable for the majority of people to not really worry about being sick until it happens. And then a trip to the doctor for a prescription is usually the answer instead of making dietary or lifestyle adjustments. With these observations in mind, let’s contemplate the following:

Would you take your car to a mechanic who cannot fix your vehicle?

Trust a dentist who has rotten teeth?

Hire a lawyer with legal problems themselves?

Exercise with a trainer who is not in great shape?

Listen to a healthcare provider who is obviously unhealthy?

Don’t confuse the message. This is not about one particular health issue such as obesity, stress, depression, etc. It is about the mindset that in the US we seem to think that it is fine to not be responsible for being out of shape, sickly, or stressed because we can always rely upon a doctor for pharmaceuticals, surgery and other invasive procedures to fix our lifestyle choices. For immediate physical trauma, I would seek and except help from anyone willing to offer. Other chronic issues, not so much. Many healthcare workers enter the workforce with the intent to help others. Ironically, due to the stress and lifestyle spawned from their professions, many find themselves in the same vicious circle of poor health choices they advise others to avoid. Health care professionals can serve a higher calling or sense of purpose if they were actually striving to be a good example of health and wellness instead of just collecting a paycheck. An inspiration or warning to others, we can all choice what we have to offer regardless of our career path. Physician heal thyself.

The correlation we are observing between healthcare providers in the US and their seemingly poor physical and mental health can be attributed to several factors. It is important to note that while this correlation exists, it does not necessarily apply to every healthcare provider, as individual experiences can vary.

  • Demanding Work Environment: Healthcare providers often work in high-stress and demanding environments, which can take a toll on their physical and mental well-being. Long working hours, irregular shifts, and the pressure to provide quality care to patients can lead to chronic stress and burnout.
  • Emotional Toll: Healthcare providers frequently deal with emotionally challenging situations, such as witnessing patient suffering, providing end-of-life care, or facing difficult ethical decisions. These experiences can contribute to emotional exhaustion, compassion fatigue, and mental health issues like depression and anxiety.
  • High Workload: The US healthcare system often faces under-staffing and resource constraints, which can result in healthcare providers taking on heavy workloads. This can lead to increased stress levels, fatigue, and limited time for self-care activities.
  • Lack of Support and Recognition: Healthcare providers may not always receive adequate support from their organizations or superiors. Lack of recognition, insufficient resources, and limited opportunities for professional growth can contribute to feelings of frustration and job dissatisfaction.
  • Stigma around Seeking Help: There can be a stigma associated with seeking help for mental health issues among healthcare providers. This stigma, coupled with the pressure to maintain a professional image, may discourage individuals from seeking the support they need.
  • Work-Life Imbalance: The demanding nature of healthcare work can make it challenging for providers to maintain a healthy work-life balance. Long hours, shift work, and irregular schedules can affect their ability to engage in self-care activities, spend time with loved ones, or pursue hobbies, leading to physical and mental health challenges.

Addressing these issues requires systemic changes within the healthcare industry, such as improving working conditions, promoting a culture of self-care and mental health support, and providing resources for healthcare providers to manage stress and prevent burnout. Organizations can play a crucial role in implementing policies that prioritize the well-being of their employees, including access to mental health services and support programs.

Additionally, healthcare providers themselves should be encouraged to prioritize self-care, seek support when needed, and engage in activities that promote their physical and mental well-being. Taking breaks, seeking therapy or counseling, engaging in regular exercise, maintaining social connections, and practicing stress management techniques can all contribute to better overall health.

Read and research some of my referenced links below if you care to delve further into this topic.

References:

One Year On: Unhealthy Weight Gains, Increased Drinking Reported By Americans Coping With Pandemic Stress. (n.d.). NEWS-Line  for Mental Health Professionals. https://www.news-line.com/SY_news30737_One-Year-On:-Unhealthy-Weight-Gains,-Increased-Drinking-Reported-By-Americans-Coping-With-Pandemic-Stress

Can Overweight Docs Really Give Credible Weight Loss Advice? (2021, July 7). WebMD. https://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20210707/overweight-doctors-credible-weight-loss-advice (ARTICLE NO LONGER AVAILABLE)

Reilly, J. M. (2007, March 1). Are Obese Physicians Effective at Providing Healthy Lifestyle Counseling? AAFP. https://www.aafp.org/pubs/afp/issues/2007/0301/p738.html

American Medical Association. (2021, November 5). What doctors wish patients knew about physician burnout. https://www.ama-assn.org/practice-management/physician-health/what-doctors-wish-patients-knew-about-physician-burnout

Battling the bulge — why nurses are prone to obesity. (2017, September 13). Financial Times. https://www.ft.com/content/ab4559ee-371f-11e7-99bd-13beb0903fa3

Shute, N. (2013, June 5). NPR Cookie Consent and Choices. NPR. https://choice.npr.org/index.html?origin=https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2013/06/05/188920874/fat-doctors-make-fat-patients-feel-better-and-worse

Cody, S. (2014, February 25). Where have all the healthy health care workers gone? Rep Man. https://www.repmanblog.com/repman/2014/02/where-have-all-the-healthy-health-care-workers-gone.html

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I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga.

For more info, contact Jim Moltzan at [email protected], 407-234-0119 or through my site at http://www.mindandbodyexercises.com

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health & wellness health care martial arts center for health meditation obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Unhealthy-Healthcare-Providers-An-Irony-That-Needs-to-Change Wed, 28 Jun 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Various Theories of Reflexology https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Various-Theories-of-Reflexology Reflexology is based on similar principles to acupuncture as well as some types of massage. Our bodies are mapped by meridians of energy, or “chi” (pronounced “chee’). When we feel pain, discomfort or uneasiness, the flow of energy is blocked in some way. By putting pressure on parts of these meridians, the practitioner sends an impulse or signal all the way along it, which unblocks it and promotes the energy to flow freely again. There are various theories as to where the mapping of the hands, feet and ears corresponds to the different components of the human body. This post focuses mostly on hand positioning methods to achieve better health.

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I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

Jim Moltzan

407-234-0119

www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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[email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi traditional chinese medicine (tcm) winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Various-Theories-of-Reflexology Sat, 24 Jun 2023 05:00:00 GMT
Exercise Affects: Anti-inflammatory Response, Growth Hormone Production & Cerebral Circulation https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Exercise-Affects-Anti-inflammatory-Response-Growth-Hormone-Production-Cerebral-Circ
  • Physical exercise can help to produce anti-inflammatory responses from the central nervous system.
    • Physical exercise can help to stimulate human growth hormone production.
    • Physical exercise can help to increase blood flow and oxygenation to the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus areas of the brain.

    Only 25% of the US population exercises regularly. We could see a much greater reduction in serious illnesses and related comorbidities if more people exercised on a regular basis. Children especially need to get off the couch, get off the phone, PC or video game, get outside, move their bodies. We all know this, but don’t want to do what it takes to change our own habits, let alone that of our kids. About 20% of US kids are obese. 80% of these will go on to be obese adults. Obesity is not the main issue but rather the illnesses that come along with it. Plant good seeds if you want good crops, right?

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) are both cytokines involved in the immune response and inflammation regulation

    IL-6 & IL-10 are stimulated during exercise. They play important roles in modulating the body’s response to exercise. Here’s an overview of the physiology of this mechanism during exercise:

    1. Interleukin-6 (IL-6): During exercise, IL-6 is released from various sources, including skeletal muscle, immune cells, and adipose tissue. Several factors contribute to the stimulation of IL-6 production:

    a. Muscle contraction: The mechanical stress placed on muscles during exercise triggers the release of IL-6 from the working muscles themselves. This release is mediated by intramuscular signaling pathways, such as calcium influx and the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways.

    b. Sympathetic nervous system activation: Exercise leads to the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which releases catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine). These catecholamines promote IL-6 production in skeletal muscle and immune cells.

    c. Tissue damage and inflammation: Intense or prolonged exercise can cause tissue damage and inflammation. This triggers the activation of immune cells, such as macrophages, which release IL-6 as part of the inflammatory response.

    1. Interleukin-10 (IL-10): IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that helps regulate the immune response and control excessive inflammation. Its production during exercise is influenced by various factors:

    a. IL-6-induced IL-10 production: IL-6, as mentioned earlier, is stimulated during exercise. Interestingly, IL-6 can also induce the production of IL-10. IL-6 acts as a signaling molecule, promoting the release of IL-10 from immune cells. This IL-6-induced IL-10 production helps regulate the immune response and minimize excessive inflammation.

    b. Anti-inflammatory feedback: IL-10 acts as a negative feedback mechanism to downregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-6 itself. By promoting the release of IL-10, exercise helps to maintain a balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors, preventing an excessive immune response.

    Both IL-6 and IL-10 have diverse effects on the body during exercise. IL-6, despite being pro-inflammatory, also has beneficial effects, such as promoting glucose uptake in muscles and stimulating lipolysis (breakdown of fats). IL-10, on the other hand, helps limit inflammation and contributes to tissue repair and recovery.

    It’s important to note that the regulation of IL-6 and IL-10 during exercise is complex, and their levels can vary based on various factors, such as exercise intensity, duration, and individual fitness levels. Additionally, the exact mechanisms underlying their release and interaction during exercise are still an active area of research.

    Strategic Trauma

    The mechanism I am referring to, where interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) are stimulated during exercise, is often described as exercise-induced cytokine production, exercise-induced cytokine response or what I have come to know as strategic trauma. It highlights the fact that exercise can trigger the release and modulation of various cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-10.

    The term “exercise-induced cytokine response” encompasses the broader concept of how exercise influences the production and release of cytokines, which are signaling molecules involved in immune regulation and inflammation. During exercise, various factors such as muscle contraction, sympathetic nervous system activation, and tissue damage contribute to the stimulation of cytokine production, including IL-6 and IL-10.

    This term acknowledges that cytokine responses can vary depending on the type, intensity, and duration of exercise, as well as individual factors. It also reflects the dynamic nature of cytokine production during exercise, as the levels of different cytokines can change in response to the specific physiological demands of the exercise bout.

    Strategic Trauma Effects Production of Human Growth Hormone

    Exercise-induced cytokine production, particularly the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6), is related to the secretion of growth hormone (GH). GH is an important hormone involved in growth, metabolism, and tissue repair. The relationship between cytokines, especially IL-6, and GH is complex and interconnected. Here’s an overview of their connection:

    1. IL-6 and GH Release: During exercise, IL-6 can stimulate the release of GH. IL-6 acts on the hypothalamus and pituitary gland to enhance the secretion of GH from the anterior pituitary. This IL-6-induced GH release is mediated through a complex signaling cascade involving the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.
    2. Synergy with Other Factors: The exercise-induced release of GH is influenced by multiple factors, and IL-6 is one of the contributing elements. Other factors, such as increased neural stimulation, lactate production, and metabolic stress, also play a role in stimulating GH release during exercise. The combined effect of IL-6, along with these other factors, leads to an overall increase in GH secretion.
    3. Anabolic Effects and Tissue Repair: GH exerts anabolic effects on various tissues, promoting protein synthesis, muscle growth, and tissue repair. It enhances the uptake of amino acids and stimulates protein synthesis in muscles, contributing to muscle growth and repair after exercise-induced damage. The increased GH secretion during exercise, partly mediated by IL-6, helps facilitate these anabolic processes.
    4. Metabolism and Fat Utilization: GH also affects metabolism and the utilization of fats during exercise. It promotes lipolysis, the breakdown of fats, which serves as an energy source during prolonged exercise. This can help spare glycogen stores and improve endurance. IL-6, as mentioned earlier, can stimulate lipolysis as well, and the interplay between IL-6 and GH contributes to the regulation of energy metabolism during exercise.

    It’s important to note that the relationship between cytokines, GH, and exercise is multifaceted and influenced by various factors. The exact mechanisms and interactions involved are still an active area of research, and further studies are needed to fully understand the intricate connections between cytokines and GH in the context of exercise.

    Effects of Exercise on the Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus

    Exercise has significant effects on both the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, two key regions of the brain involved in cognition, learning, memory, and mood regulation. Regular exercise has been found to positively impact the structure and function of these brain areas. Here are some of the effects:

    1. Prefrontal Cortex: The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is responsible for higher cognitive functions, such as decision-making, attention, working memory, and executive control. Exercise has been shown to have several positive effects on the PFC:

    a. Increased Blood Flow and Oxygenation: Exercise enhances blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain, including the PFC. This improved cerebral blood flow helps nourish brain cells and supports optimal PFC function.

    b. Neuroplasticity and Synaptic Growth: Exercise promotes neuroplasticity, the brain’s ability to change and adapt. It stimulates the growth and branching of dendrites, the communication pathways between neurons. This synaptic growth in the PFC improves neural connectivity and strengthens cognitive abilities.

    c. Enhanced Executive Functions: Regular exercise has been associated with improvements in executive functions, including attention, working memory, cognitive flexibility, and inhibitory control. These enhancements are thought to be related to the positive effects of exercise on the PFC.

    1. Hippocampus: The hippocampus is a region crucial for learning, memory formation, and spatial navigation. Exercise has profound effects on the hippocampus, including:

    a. Neurogenesis: Exercise promotes the generation of new neurons in the hippocampus, a process known as neurogenesis. These newly formed neurons are believed to contribute to improved learning and memory.

    b. Enhanced Memory and Learning: Exercise has been linked to enhanced spatial memory, declarative memory (facts and events), and associative learning, all of which rely on the hippocampus. Regular physical activity can improve the encoding, consolidation, and retrieval of memories.

    c. Mood Regulation: The hippocampus is involved in mood regulation, and exercise has been shown to have antidepressant effects. Regular exercise increases neurotrophic factors and neurotransmitters, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and serotonin, which positively influence mood and emotional well-being.

    It’s worth noting that the effects of exercise on the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus can vary depending on various factors, such as the type, intensity, and duration of exercise, as well as an individual’s fitness level and genetic factors. Nonetheless, consistent evidence suggests that exercise plays a significant role in promoting brain health and optimizing cognitive functions in these critical brain regions.

    References:

    Chronic Disease Infographics | CDC. (n.d.). https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/tools/infographics.htm

    Islam, H., Neudorf, H., Mui, A.L. and Little, J.P. (2021), Interpreting ‘anti-inflammatory’ cytokine responses to exercise: focus on interleukin-10. J Physiol, 599: 5163-5177. https://doi.org/10.1113/JP281356

    Petzinger, G. M., Fisher, B. E., McEwen, S., Beeler, J. A., Walsh, J. P., & Jakowec, M. W. (2013). Exercise-enhanced neuroplasticity targeting motor and cognitive circuitry in Parkinson’s disease. Lancet Neurology12(7), 716–726. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(13)70123-6

     Erickson, K. I., & Kramer, A. F. (2009). Aerobic exercise effects on cognitive and neural plasticity in older adults. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 43(1), 22-24.

     Hillman, C. H., Erickson, K. I., & Kramer, A. F. (2008). Be smart, exercise your heart: exercise effects on brain and cognition. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 9(1), 58-65.

     Cotman, C. W., & Berchtold, N. C. (2002). Exercise: a behavioral intervention to enhance brain health and plasticity. Trends in Neurosciences, 25(6), 295-301.

     Kramer, A. F., Erickson, K. I., & Colcombe, S. J. (2006). Exercise, cognition, and the aging brain. Journal of Applied Physiology, 101(4), 1237-1242.

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain depression diabetes health & wellness health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Exercise-Affects-Anti-inflammatory-Response-Growth-Hormone-Production-Cerebral-Circ Wed, 21 Jun 2023 10:12:41 GMT
    Book 24 – Health & Wellness Graphic Reference Book https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Book-24-Health-Wellness-Graphic-Reference-Book My new reference book is now available on Amazon!

    Book 24 – Health & Wellness Graphic Reference Book (Health and Wellness Study Guides Using Eastern Practices From Martial Arts, Yoga and Qigong) . This book is an encyclopedia of knowledge and is priced accordingly.

    Remember the Indiana Jones movies, where he found his father’s diary which had clues to his search for the Holy Grail? Well, I have been searching for over 40 years for the Holy Grail of health, wellness, fitness and self-awareness. I have been producing graphics to depict what I believe to be the key components of health and happiness.

    Over 400 pages in this study guide, consisting of mostly color graphics of concepts for better health and wellness, from allopathic and Traditional Chinese Medicine, anatomy & physiology, qigong, martial arts and yoga exercises and philosophy on these topics. Additionally, there are graphics depicting theories on the human life cycle, psychology relative to components of fitness and many other subjects pertaining to mental and physical well being. This reference book contains many exercise sets for rehabilitating injuries and illness as well as others to promote longevity and a better quality of life. Additionally, this book contains an appendix of over 30 pages of my personal typed notes on teaching, coaching and eastern philosophy. Review the watermarked edition just below here.

    book-24-with-appendix-12-06-02-2023-watermarked_compressed-1Download
    Click image to be directed to Amazon.com


    My books, journals and graphics are the summation of over 40 years of my training, education, teaching and public speaking of martial arts, qigong, fitness, wellness, TCM and other facets of self-improvement. Similar to popular study guides such as Quick Study or PermaCharts, these graphic and text guides cut to the chase in order to minimize precious time spent muddling through extensive textbooks seeking understanding of specific concepts. Each guide is packed with the root knowledge regarding specific topics. This format is highly beneficial for the novice as well as experts in the fields of health, wellness and self-improvement.

    The majority of my knowledge base is in theories, methods and techniques from almost 40 years of learning, training and teaching. The Qigong (breathing work) is from Chinese Kung Fu and the Korean Dong Han medical Qigong lineage. The core fitness movements are from Kung Fu and its forms in Baguazhang and Ship Pal Gi (Korean Kung Fu and weapons training). Each martial art and its fitness exercises can complement and enhance one another. The more ways that you can move your body, the better it is for your overall health.

    I have also gained much knowledge of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) from many TCM practitioners, martial arts masters, teachers and peers. This includes many techniques and practices of acupressure (reflexology, auricular, Jing Well, etc.), acupuncture, moxibustion as well as preparation of some herbal remedies and extracts for conditioning and injuries. I have been studying for over 20 years with Zen Wellness, learning medical Qigong as well as other Eastern methods of fitness and self awareness. I have been recognized as a “Gold Coin” master instructor having trained and taught others for at least 10000 hours or roughly over 35 years. I have pursued my BS degree in wellness and alternative medicine, which has helped me to expand my understanding of health/wellness into other areas of study in anatomy/physiology, integrative methods, meditation, stress and trauma management, psychology, religion, nutrition and other relative topics.

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease promotional ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Book-24-Health-Wellness-Graphic-Reference-Book Wed, 14 Jun 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Profit vs. Ethics in the Big Pharma View of Business https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Profit-vs-Ethics-in-the-Big-Pharma-View-of-Business From a strictly financial perspective, it may be considered a good business strategy for a pharmaceutical company to generate billions of dollars in profits for a particular product, even if they end up paying millions of dollars in fines or lawsuits. However, this viewpoint does not take into account the ethical considerations and potential harm that may result from the company’s actions. We have seen this play out many times in recent years as some very large pharma corps have been fined substantial amounts, but are still allowed to operate and profit. I am not sure how this works exactly, so I did some research.

    I would think that it is important for companies to operate with integrity and ethical principles, and to prioritize the safety and well-being of their customers. When companies engage in practices that result in harm or violate regulations, they may face legal consequences and negative publicity that can damage their reputation and erode public trust.

    Furthermore, paying fines or settling lawsuits does not necessarily address the underlying issues that led to the misconduct in the first place. Companies should focus on improving their practices and ensuring that their products are safe and effective, rather than solely on maximizing profits. However, we all pretty much know that in the US world of healthcare, most of the money is gained in treating the sick rather than preventing illness. Money talks and bullshit walks.

    In summary, while generating significant profits may be a goal for many companies, it is important to consider the ethical implications of their actions and prioritize the safety and well-being of their customers. Engaging in misconduct that results in fines or lawsuits may not be a sustainable or ethical business strategy in the long run. In spite of this concept, big pharma has done pretty well for itself, especially during the recent COVID-19 pandemic where record profits were reported, while being exempt from any liability from its mass distribution of products to counter its infection.

    Pharmaceutical industry gets high on fat profits - BBC News

    References:

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-28212223

    https://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/news/2016/03/31/gsk-pfe-bms-nvs-pay-most-in-fines.html

    https://www.pharmaceutical-technology.com/features/these-were-the-biggest-pharmaceutical-deals-in-early-2022/

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease pharma qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Profit-vs-Ethics-in-the-Big-Pharma-View-of-Business Sat, 10 Jun 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    The Weakest Hand & Wrist Positions https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/The-Weakest-Hand-Wrist-Positions These graphic below images show the various hand and wrist positioning that aside form self-defense applications, are common positions that people accidentally fall onto while trying to mitigate falls. Further down, this page details various exercises to help increase strength, flexibility, and dexterity of the wrists, hands and fingers. One can practice these exercises as a form of preventive maintenance.

    At the root of all physical conditioning exercises is some level of self-induced or “strategic trauma.” While practice these exercises there maybe some pain and discomfort, which as a positive attribute stimulates the nervous system.

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.comwww.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain diabetes fall prevention health & wellness health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi wrist injury yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/The-Weakest-Hand-Wrist-Positions Wed, 07 Jun 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Head, Stomach, Feet (learn – process – implement) https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Head-Stomach-Feet-learn-process-implement Many years ago, I was introduced to this concept of “Head, Stomach, Feet,” a Taoist philosophy taught to me by my martial arts teachers. Me and my peers of that time were instructed to use our eyes, ears, nose, taste and touch/feel to observe what was being presented to us. This might have been a particular self-defense technique, exercise method, herbal recipe or maybe complex theories on energetic anatomy, kinesiology or self-awareness and realization. Over some time and repetition of diligent practice, we would be tasked with processing the information and “make it ours.” As even more time, effort and practice was accumulated, we would be able to more wisely discern how we were to use this valuable knowledge, whether for our own benefit or those we also taught, or others we cared to share with.

    This concept need not be kept unique to martial arts, but rather utilized by anyone willing to dissect how they themselves learn something new with the intent on putting it to use later. How can we expect to teach someone else something that we ourselves do not fully understand? Can a parent truly teach their child about algebra, nutrition, fitness, stress management, etc., that they themselves have not learned and experienced on some level? Can a sports coach teach players proper form and technique if they have not personally experienced and benefited from such practices? Similarly would someone pursue learning about health, wellness and fitness, from a teacher who themselves is not healthy? Or even trust a healthcare professional that is not an example of what they preach to others about healthcare?

    Head: Observe, Learn

    The body’s Brain” is the commander of the central nervous system (CNS) that manages most physiological body functions. Input from the sensory organs provides stimulus for the brain to process in order to sustain life, with relative health and happiness.

    Stomach: Contemplate, Process, Digest

    The body’s “second Brain” is the enteric nervous system (ENS) that manages the gut. This extensive network uses the same chemicals and cells as the brain to help us digest not just food, but sensory input to alert the brain when something is out of order or awry.

    Feet: Implement, Put Into Action

    Once the brain observes stimulus, and then processes this input, other thought processes determine the “how and why’s” of putting this input either into short-term memory (STM) for immediate usage or stored into long-term memory (LTM) for later access.

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain diabetes health care human behavior martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/6/Head-Stomach-Feet-learn-process-implement Sat, 03 Jun 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    How to Increase Hand Grip Strength – No Gym Required https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/5/How-to-Increase-Hand-Grip-Strength-No-Gym-Required Most people do not exercise, only about 25% of the US population. Of those that do, very few exercise for specific outcomes beyond building muscle strength, cardiovascular health and maybe some light stretching for flexibility and range of motion. What about exercising for breath control, vestibular balance (inner ear), symmetry of left/right. top/bottom, inside/outside, coordination, mobility of the fingers and toes? Most people just don’t put attention to these areas until they start to have issues and then they might look into addressing these imbalances. Very important but often neglected is hand grip strength. When the hand grip is weak, people are less likely to hold onto weights during weight training, so they begin to avoid this type of exercise. A weak grip affects the ability to grab onto something stable when losing one’s balance or falling. A weak grip makes it harder for someone to be independent as they become more and more insecure in themselves and depend more upon others to lift groceries, grandchildren and typical everyday tasks. The below exercise are free, simple albeit effective for those committed to the time and effort required to gain the benefits. Start with a few repetitions, eventually building up to sets of 100 or more. These exercises are safe when practiced correctly with the toes, knees and hips always lined up one atop another with no sideways stress on the knee joints.

    Unique to these exercises, is the body posture combined with the correct hand and arm positions, and the extra awareness required to keep the lower body stable while also maintaining the correct body alignments. By squeezing the hands into fist and then opening them moving only the hands and wrists, the fascia trains, the nervous, muscular and skeletal systems are all engaged throughout the entire body. Try to hold the static position while performing the wrist exercise, from steps 1, 2, 3, 4 and back to 1 for consecutive repetitions. Holding the stance generally develops overall strength where as repetitive wrist positions develops stamina, endurance and determination. Relax the body into the positions in spite of any tension in the muscles. Deep and relaxed breathing is essential while performing this exercise. Try 10x each, building to 20x, 30x, 100x 300x. Yes, this is achievable gradually over time and with much effort.

    Variation #1; Arms to the sides, engage the muscles of the pectoral, shoulders, and upper back at different angles increasing strength in many directions.

    Variation #2; Using either/both of the above arm directions, sink the hips into a horse stance. High , medium and low positions of the hips will greatly increase the difficulty and strength building benefits of this exercise set. Additionally, attempting to stay in this lower body position in spite of the cramping, pain and discomfort, this is a method to develop strength of the nervous system due to so many innervated muscles being engaged at the same time. In energetic practices from martial arts, daoyin and yoga, this practice is called “burning of the chong mai” in reference to the thrusting energy vessel (meridian) that extends from the base of the tailbone upwards towards the top of the head.

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercisesMind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47QoJim Moltzan407-234-0119www.MindAndBodyExercises.comwww.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong specific methods of wellness practice stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/5/How-to-Increase-Hand-Grip-Strength-No-Gym-Required Wed, 31 May 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Assuming Responsibility for your Healthcare (sickcare) Decisions https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/5/Assuming-Responsibility-for-your-Healthcare-sickcare-Decisions The predominant medical system in the US is the allopathic model. I have found from personal experience that this system works usually quite well for diagnostics, trauma, conditions requiring surgical intervention, as well as treatments for prolonging life.

    Where I feel our allopathic model falls short is encouraging prevention of illnesses and avoidable conditions, treating certain types of chronic conditions, and providing quality of life in spite of prolonging it. A wise doctor I visited once told me that a way to make a decision to have or not have a procedure, was to determine if you have more good days or more bad days, within a particular time frame. His next question was, are you willing to live with the outcome if the results are not 100% successful and possibly giving side-effects that are worse than the original issues?

    I think many people put all of their trust and faith into their doctor’s opinions or suggestions without doing much research of their own. Therefore, they lack the information to better determine what is best for their individual conditions.  When confronted with a serious condition, they feel they lack medical knowledge and therefore options beyond what their doctor might suggest. When things don’t go well with the treatments, procedures, surgeries, etc., they can’t always understand that doctors are human and don’t always make the best decisions in spite of trying their best to do so. 

    I think if people would take more responsibility towards their knowledge of healthcare and their own health status prior to finding themselves in critical situations, we would have a much different healthcare system. The CDC reported the top causes of death in the US as of 2019 were heart disease, cancer, and unintended injuries1. Overall, the risks of the top 10 causes of death all can be lowered with lifestyle choices of diet, exercise, and management of stress. A John Hopkins report of 2018 reported that medical errors was the 3rd highest cause of death in the US2. My point in noting these statistics is that if the total number of these illnesses and errors was much less, then there would be less people having to deal with these critical types of decisions with or without their doctor’s input. I am aware that this is really an unrealistic expectation as the numbers go up every year. However, if doctors are to be held to such a high standard of perfection, why shouldn’t the individual have similar accountability for their own level of self-care?

    Obviously, some situations warrant a decision at the moment, regardless of how the person got to the point of immediate concern.  In this type of event, I would hope that the healthcare professionals involved would have much relative knowledge and medical experience at this point to exercise wisdom in making the correct decisions. From there the patient needs to decide whether to trust in what they know to be true and accurate and/or to have faith in what is unknown and unseen.

    References:

    1 https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db395.htm

    2https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/study_suggests_medical_errors_now_third_leading_cause_of_death_in_the_us

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercisesMind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.comwww.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health care human behavior martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/5/Assuming-Responsibility-for-your-Healthcare-sickcare-Decisions Sat, 27 May 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Box Breathing: A Method to Manage Stress https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/5/Box-Breathing-A-Method-to-Manage-Stress

    So much inner conflict, anxiety, depression, PTSD. We have tools to combat this that don’t include pharmaceuticals, therapy or other harsh interventions. Americans have been conditioned (operant conditioning, B.F. Skinner) to rely upon others for their own well-being, health and happiness. Happiness comes from within. Most figure this out at some time in their life. Never for some.

    Learning to manage our own breath, leads to managing our emotions, which affects our blood chemistry, relative organ function and overall health. Box breathing and other methods cost nothing but time, effort and a realization that our nation’s healthcare crises can be improved when people take responsibilities for their own health and relative outcomes.

    From a report from the White House:

    “There are several indications that Americans were experiencing a mental health crisis prior to the pandemic. Between 2008 and 2019, the percentage of adolescents (ages 12 to 17) that reported having experienced at least one major depressive episode in the past year increased nearly 90 percent, from 8.3 percent in 2008 to 15.7 percent in 2019, while the percentage of young adults (ages 18 to 25) reporting at least one major depressive episode in the past year increased a similar 81 percent from 8.4 percent in 2008 to 15.2 percent in 2019 (Figure 1). Over roughly the same period, suicide death rates among individuals 10 to 24 years of age increased 47 percent. Although rates of depression were highest among adolescents and young adults, more broadly in 2019, over one in five adults age 18 or older were classified as having a mental illness, and more than 13.1 million (or 5 percent) of adults had disorders that were classified as serious because they substantially interfered with or limited one or more major life activities. Rates of mental illness were highest among those age 18 to 25, females, and those reporting their race as other, as shown in Figure 2.

    Among children age 3-17, the most commonly diagnosed mental disorders from 2013 to 2019 were ADHD (9.8 percent), anxiety (9.4 percent), behavioral problems (8.9 percent), and depression (4.4 percent). These disorders often begin in early childhood: approximately one in six U.S. children age 2-8 had a diagnosed mental, behavioral or developmental disorder.”

    Deeper breathing is a key component to having a long and healthy life. Through focused and deliberate breathing methods, many positive mental and physical benefits can be achieved. Box breathing is a technique to slow one’s breathing rate per minute (BPM). Slower BPM allows precise self-regulation of the parasympathetic nervous system, also referred to as the or the “rest and digest” response or the sympathetic nervous system also known as “flight or fight” response. Both of these responses regulate our blood chemistry which can affect emotions as well as organ function. This technique needs to practice regularly and often in order to gain the benefits of deep and regulated breathing. One time will not do much.

    ____________

    ____________

    ____________

    Tai chi, qigong, martial arts, meditation, yoga and some other exercise curriculum often offer box breathing techniques and many others. I have been practicing, studying and teaching these methods for almost 40 years with incredible results for myself and the hundreds of others that I have shared this knowledge with.

    Reference:

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/cea/written-materials/2022/05/31/reducing-the-economic-burden-of-unmet-mental-health-needs/

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercisesMind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.comwww.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong specific methods of wellness practice stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/5/Box-Breathing-A-Method-to-Manage-Stress Wed, 24 May 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Grip Strength Affects Overall Health & Wellness https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/5/Grip-Strength-Affects-Overall-Health-Wellness

    Weight-bearing exercises can help prevent osteoporosis by stimulating bone growth and increasing bone density. This is because weight-bearing exercises put stress on your bones, which signals your body to build more bone tissue to handle the stress.

    When you perform weight-bearing exercises like walking, running, and weightlifting, the weight and impact of these exercises on your bones stimulate the bone-forming cells called osteoblasts. These cells create new bone tissue, which can help increase bone density and prevent osteoporosis.

    Additionally, weight-bearing exercises help to maintain muscle mass and strength, which is also important for preventing osteoporosis. Strong muscles help to support your bones and reduce the risk of falls and fractures.

    It’s important to note that not all exercises are weight-bearing. Non-weight-bearing exercises like swimming and cycling, for example, don’t provide the same impact on your bones as weight-bearing exercises. Therefore, incorporating weight-bearing exercises into your exercise routine can be an effective way to prevent osteoporosis. However, it’s always a good idea to talk to your doctor or a qualified fitness professional before starting any new exercise program.

    Tai chi, qigong, yoga and various other exercises from martial arts offer weight-bearing, and often low impact exercises. These systems have a wide spectrum of these types of exercise within their respective curriculum, for which I have been studying, practicing and teaching for almost 40 years, with truly amazing results.

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercisesMind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.comwww.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health & wellness health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/5/Grip-Strength-Affects-Overall-Health-Wellness Sat, 20 May 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Mind and Body Exercises – Heal the Body With the Mind, Heal the Mind by Engaging the Body https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/5/Mind-and-Body-Exercises-Heal-the-Body-With-the-Mind-Heal-the-Mind-by-Engaging-the-Body Remember the Indiana Jones movies, where he found his father’s diary which had clues to his search for the Holy Grail?

    Well, I have been searching for over 40 years for the Holy Grail of health, wellness, fitness and self-awareness. I have been producing graphics to depict what I believe to be the key components of health and happiness.

    Find my graphics and/or booklets on my website or Amazon at:

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    https://www.amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercisesMind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.comwww.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease promotional ptsd qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/5/Mind-and-Body-Exercises-Heal-the-Body-With-the-Mind-Heal-the-Mind-by-Engaging-the-Body Wed, 17 May 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Mindful Breathing Practices as an Option for Coping with Trauma https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/Mindful-Breathing-Practices-as-an-Option-for-Coping-with-Trauma This is yet another of my posts on my scholarly research into the benefits of exercise, and more specifically methods of mindfulness (such as qigong) as treatments for mental health ailments.

    Various types of traumas exist such as that of child abuse, sexual abuse, domestic violence, community violence, non-interpersonal trauma, death, or serious illness of a loved one, being bullied, physical assault, threats of aggression, exposure to combat among others. Various types of traumas can have a wide range of different psychological effects and outcomes. Potentially traumatic life events (PTLE) are negative incidents that may potentially compromise an individual’s ability to cope with a considerable amount of stress, resulting in a fear of death, destruction, or even insanity. Recent research has found that exposure to trauma is much more prevalent than previously recognized, where between 50% – 75% of individuals have encountered potentially traumatic situations. Self-medicating through use of various substances may be utilized to counter adverse psychological symptoms, however substances can also increase affective dysregulation and mental discomfort. This may lead to a vicious cycle of an increased desire to further self-medicate, creating a possible opportunity for other addictive behaviors (Levin et al., 2021).

    There is evidence supporting that mindful breathing practices can be an effective alternative to using pharmaceuticals for treating those that suffer from past trauma. Mindful breathing practices encourage empowerment of the individual to be proactive towards their own wellbeing. Mindful breathing classes are becoming more popular with those suffering from trauma. While some sufferers of trauma may find mindful breathing practices to be time consuming or not worth the effort, mindful breathing practices can be effective in helping people better cope with trauma, are relatively easy to learn and practice, are generally inexpensive and available to most people.

    It is estimated that more than 80% of the US population will be subject to some type of traumatic event during some time in their lives, with over 8% of those exposed going on to develop post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD (Schein et al., 2021b). While there are many types of traumas, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most common. PTSD sufferers are more prone to experience symptoms of substance abuse, anger, irritability, depression, distractibility, irritability, sleep disorders, relationship conflicts, issues in their workplace, chronic pain, suicide, and other medical issues (Colgan et al., 2017).

    A recent study reports of PTSD’s 1-year prevalence spanning from 2.6% – 6.0% with civilians and ranging from 6.7% – 11.7% with US veterans. The lifetime prevalence spanned from 3.4% – 8.0% with civilians and from 7.7% – 13.4% with veterans. Women have almost twice the 1-year prevalence of PTSD compared to men, as do veterans also having roughly twice the prevalence of that of civilians. Overall estimates are quite varied due to the underdiagnosed character of this psychiatric disorder, the heterogeneity or diversity of a population, and the potential for misdiagnosis. Various subpopulations have been reported to have higher prevalence of being diagnosed with PTSD such as emergency 1st responders, American Indian/Alaska Natives, trans-masculine individuals, persons with substantial substance use, those having attempted suicide, females with previous military sexual trauma, and refugees. Additional risk factors would be young persons, females, lower income individuals, and those with mental health disorders (Schein et al., 2021b).

    Mindfulness is based on philosophical perspectives from Buddhist teachings, where one would focus on sustaining their attention in a specific manner, with intent, without judgement, and having a purpose, while striving to be present in the moment (Kabat-Zinn, 2003). Mindful based interventions (MBI) are rooted in methods that had been distilled over thousands of years in Eastern philosophies. Most of these methods require the individual to become strongly motivated to commit to making conscious changes in their everyday lives (Marzillier 2014). Researchers have classified 12 various categories of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) which would include focused attention, redirecting disturbing thoughts of events, letting go of negative thoughts, emotions, or physical pain. Also, relaxing/calming and slowing down, coping with sleep disorders, thinking logically and rationally, mantra techniques, reduction in flashbacks, sharing of thoughts and feelings more constructively, and self-awareness of spirituality (Colgan et al., 2017). MBI methods also may include breathing-based meditation (with rhythmic breathing), mindfulness meditation (participants strive to remain present), compassion meditation (loving‐kindness meditation) and Transcendental meditation (practitioners repeat or focus upon a mantra) (Haider 2021). Consistent practice with personal experience in applying mindfulness to one’s own life on a daily basis, is a basic requirement that is found with all the MBIs. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has integrated basic techniques from yoga and meditation to the benefit of people who had never imagined implementing such methods (Marzillier 2014). Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) was first introduced by John Kabat-Zinn, focuses on the practice and refinement of mindfulness techniques, specifically of sitting meditation, body scanning, and mindful movement of the body with methods of yoga and tai chi (Reangsing 2021). It is important to note that not all mindfulness-based interventions are considered as being yoga, tai chi and qigong. However, by their definition yoga, tai chi and qigong are mindfulness-based interventions in that they all utilize within their practices the concept of mindful breathing (MB). MB is basically where the practitioner attempts to bring sustained awareness to their breath as it enters through their nostrils and then rises and falls in their lungs with each following respiration. There are many more methods that vary in their specific benefits and relative complexity.

    A study was conducted for 6-weeks as part of a bigger study at the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) Neurology Department ongoing from 2009-2013, with 102 veterans (96 males and 6 females) having been previously diagnosed with chronic PTSD and averaging 52 years of age. The goal of this study was to research the physiological benefits of slow breathing (SB) compared to mindfulness, in people with PTSD. The participants were tasked with engaging with 1 of 4 mindfulness methods consisting of mindful breathing (MB), slow breathing, body scanning (BS) or sitting quietly (SQ). Participants using MB techniques used a tape or CD of a 20-minute guided meditation, where they were to practice daily at their homes. They were directed to sit upright while attempting to bring their awareness to that of their breath as it entered through the nostrils and then fell to their chest and abdomen. If their focus strayed from the breath, they were directed to just acknowledge the distracting thought, allow it to pass, and then return awareness to their breath. The study results reported six key benefits from the participants’ responses, which consisted of a greater ability to relax, an improvement in coping skills, an enhanced awareness of being in the present, an increase in nonreactivity, an improvement in nonjudgmental acceptance, a reduction in stress reactivity and less physiological arousal. The participants in the body scan and mindful breathing groups, reported more positive benefits in reducing PTSD symptoms, then those in the slow breathing or quiet sitting groups (Colgan et al., 2017).

    A randomized control trial from 2014 included 21 US veterans diagnosed with PTSD. Participants were introduced to breathing-based meditation utilizing Sudarshan Kriya Yoga, where they took part in a 7-day, 21-hour total intervention with a daily group yoga class lasting for 3 hours. At the end of the intervention, members reported reductions in anxiety symptoms, and a lower rate of breathing. In a similar study with 102 veterans in 2016, participants were randomized to 3 different types of MBI being that of sitting quietly (SQ), slow breathing (SB), mindfulness meditation (MM), MM with SB, and SB with a biofeedback device. SB and MM groups met once a week for 6 weeks while practicing at home and on their own for 20-minintes a day. The results reported the most improvements in PTSD symptom scores in the MM group, with the next most being the MM plus SB group, followed by the SQ group and finally the SB group (Haider 2021).

    Depersonalization disorder (DPD) is another condition that may result from exposure to traumatic events. Symptoms of DPD would be delusions, or a feeling of being an outside observer to one’s own actions, feelings, thoughts, and sensations, while also experiencing a detachment in regard to their surroundings. Research supports that mindful breathing may immediately help DPD patients reduce feelings of depersonalization by increasing feelings of being grounded. The theory is that by directing self-awareness towards the physical sensations of one’s own breathing while listening to particular sounds, patients become more grounded in focusing on their breathing than losing themselves in ruminative self-observation. Ruminative and detached self-observation are thought to be key components in mechanisms that regulate depersonalization. Mindfulness exercises may allocate cognitive resources to limbic and insular cortices pathways that process emotional stimuli and thereby aid in managing damaged self-awareness (Michal et al., 2013).

    Other research finds that there is a strong correlation between reduced orbitofrontal and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) blood circulation derived from childhood emotional abuse, where individuals had experienced repetitive stressful events over a particular length of time. The orbitofrontal and vmPFC sends signals to the amygdala. There is speculation that a deficiency in consistent orbitofrontal and vmPFC activity, along with hyperactivity of the amygdala responding to repetitive stress, might be a strong indicator of being susceptible to depression. Further research indicates that healthy adults may be able to consciously control their emotions by increasing their vmPFC activity if exposed repetitively to a stressor. This is important to note that from previous research, that repeated mindful breathing over a prolonged period of time, can result in reduced agitation of areas of the brain that regulate emotional status such as the amygdala and thalamus, and imagery memory management from the hippocampus and fusiform gyrus (Wang et al., 2013).

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) offers a much different perspective on trauma, from that of allopathic medicine. TCM views our life force or qi, which can become blocked, depleted, scattered, and even injured by a wide spectrum of environmental and psychological causes, such as trauma. TCM recognizes that trauma can be directly experienced and even inherited from our parents. Injuries to one’s qi from external factors as well as traumatic events, affect the energy meridians which transport qi, as well as the physiological organ systems (Aanavi, 2014). One of TCM’s branches of treatment is qigong, or literally translated to “breath work”. Taijiquan (tai chi or taiji) is perhaps the most commonly known type of qigong practice. Qigong offers a huge curriculum of traditional practices that can cultivate, increase, focus, and even heal one’s qi through specific physical exercises and deliberate regulated breathing methods. Qigong offers both medical and martial applications through mindfulness and self-awareness. Recent studies regarding Tai chi qigong (TCQ) practice reported overall high satisfaction. There were no apparent negative reactions nor side effects. In one study participants noted muscle soreness that decreased later in the treatment duration. Other reported that participants found the sessions to reduce stress, were relaxing and/or calming and showed a reduction in mental health symptoms of PTSD, such as anxiety and depression. Other studies reported of increased feelings of empowerment and control over their symptoms. Also, better sleep quality, reduction in pain, improvement in physical functioning, increased ability to focus. One study did note some obstacles in their participation, like scheduling conflicts, emotional issues, work conflicts, transportation challenges and physical or health-related limitations (Niles et al., 2022).

    While these studies do offer much to contemplate regarding the many psychological and physical benefits from such practices, the data needs to be more accurately and purposefully organized and compiled. There are many more factors that come into play regarding the efficacy of mindful breathing practices that many of these studies did not address, such as length, duration, and intensity of a particular practice session. Additionally, the type or style of the methods as well as the attitude, experience, and qualification level of the instructor, and sometimes the student/patient can have effects on desired outcomes from practicing these methods. Regardless of these factors, studies do support mindful breathing practices as being an effective treatment option for coping with past experiences from trauma events.

    References

    Aanavi, M. (2014). Trauma, Qigong, And Trust. California Journal of Oriental Medicine (CJOM), 25(1), 23–25.
    Colgan DD, Wahbeh H, Pleet M, Besler K, Christopher M. (2017). A Qualitative Study of Mindfulness Among Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Practices Differentially Affect Symptoms, Aspects of Well-Being, and Potential Mechanisms of Action. Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine. 2017;22(3):482-493. doi:10.1177/2156587216684999


    Haider, T., M.P.H., Dai, C., PhD., & Sharma, M., PhD. (2021, Winter). Efficacy of meditation-based interventions on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among veterans: A narrative review. Advances in Mind – Body Medicine, 35, 16-24. Retrieved from https://northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://www.proquest.com/magazines/efficacy-meditation-based-interventions-on-post/docview/2494554894/se-2

    Kabat-Zinn, J. (2003). Mindfulness-based interventions in context: Past, present, and future. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 10(2), 144–156. https://doi.org/10.1093/clipsy.bpg016


    Levin, Y., Lev Bar-Or, R., Forer, R., Vaserman, M., Kor, A., & Lev-Ran, S. (2021). The association between type of trauma, level of exposure and addiction. Addictive Behaviors, 118. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2021.106889

    Marzillier, J. (2014). The Trauma Therapies: Vol. First edition. OUP Oxford.
    Michal, M., Koechel, A., Canterino, M., Adler, J., Reiner, I., Vossel, G., Beutel, M. E., & Gamer, M. (2013). Depersonalization disorder: Disconnection of cognitive evaluation from autonomic responses to emotional stimuli. PLoS ONE, 8(9). https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0074331


    Niles, B. L., Reid, K. F., Whitworth, J. W., Alligood, E., Williston, S. K., Grossman, D. H., McQuade, M. M., & Mori, D. L. (2022). Tai Chi and Qigong for trauma exposed populations: A systematic review. Mental Health and Physical Activity, 22. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1016/j.mhpa.2022.100449

    Reangsing, C., Punsuwun, S., & Schneider, J. K. (2021). Effects of mindfulness interventions on depressive symptoms in adolescents: A meta-analysis. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 115. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2020.103848


    Schein, J., Houle, C., Urganus, A., Cloutier, M., Patterson-Lomba, O., Wang, Y., King, S., Levinson, W., Guérin, A., Lefebvre, P., & Davis, L. L. (2021b). Prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder in the United States: a systematic literature review. Current Medical Research and Opinion, 37(12), 2151–2161. https://doi.org/10.1080/03007995.2021.1978417

    Wang, L., Paul, N., Stanton, S. J., Greeson, J. M., & Smoski, M. J. (2013). Loss of sustained activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in response to repeated stress in individuals with early-life emotional abuse: implications for depression vulnerability. Frontiers in psychology, 4, 320. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00320

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong specific methods of wellness practice stress management stress relief tai chi trauma winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/Mindful-Breathing-Practices-as-an-Option-for-Coping-with-Trauma Sat, 29 Apr 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Yoga as a Treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/Yoga-as-a-Treatment-for-Post-Traumatic-Stress-Disorder This post continues my scholarly research into the benefits of exercise, and more specifically yoga, its sibling of qigong and other methods of mindfulness as treatments for mental health ailments.

    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted a large-scale web-based survey of 5000 adults in the United States with results reflecting that almost all were affected by at least one adverse mental or behavioral health issue related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Results also showed that more than one-quarter of the participants experienced symptoms of post-traumatic stress-related disorder or PTSD (Nagarajan et al., 2022). Post-traumatic stress disorder is described as a psychological health condition that may emerge in response to experiencing traumatic events, such as severe injuries, assault, natural disasters, and war. PTSD is a worldwide health issue and of concern in the United States, occurring across many demographics but with prevalence in affecting post-war veterans (Piotrowski et al., 2022). Alternative methods have been becoming more acceptable within the field of PTSD treatment. The purpose of this paper is to help determine how effective practices such as yoga and similar mindfulness practices can be an option when treating symptoms of PTSD. Veterans and others with PTSD can possibly benefit immensely from yoga and mindfulness methods based upon past and recent research (Neukirch et al., 2019).

    Yoga and mindfulness techniques have shown to be beneficial in reducing symptoms of anxiety, depression, and other psychological health conditions in veterans as well as other demographics. These techniques can continue to be effective if individuals practice what they have learned from experiments and continue the practices while on their own at home. An important side-effect of yoga practice is the decrease in the hypothalamus-adrenal-pituitary-axis (HPA-axis) activity from physiological arousal. The HPA-axis is the main mechanism that regulates the adrenal hormone cortisol, in response to coping with stress. Prolonged elevated levels of cortisol are correlated to compromised cognitive functions (Zaccari et al., 2020).

    The COVID-19 pandemic has threatened the lives of millions of people worldwide, making it a traumatic phenomenon of its own, regardless of those having suffered from the disease. Additionally, those previously hospitalized with having severe COVID-19 infection may be more likely to be diagnosed with PTSD. Separate from the disease itself, hospitalized patients may have encountered other challenges such as time away from home and loved ones, social stigmatism, and financial hardships relative to receiving treatment (Nagarajan et al., 2022).

    Demographic factors such as race, age, ethnicity, education, and gender have been associated with notable variations in amounts of exposure to trauma, available support resources, and subjection to other stressors. Younger, less educated, female, and ethnic minorities may be more systematically disadvantaged with having PTSD. Experiences of specific types of traumas such as exposure to combat, moral injury situations and military sexual trauma (MST), as well as increasing trauma and other life stressors also have been connected to an increased risk of PTSD with veterans (Copeland et al., 2022).

    Some of the defining symptoms of PTSD would include diminished interest in activities, irritability, recklessness, aggression, aggressiveness, avoidance, detachment from others, depression, anxiety, mood swings, sleep disorders, suicidal thoughts and tendencies, hyperarousal symptoms, intrusive memories of the trauma, reoccurring and disturbing dreams or nightmares, outbursts of anger, self-destructive behavior, difficulty with concentration and sometimes a continual and distorted sense of blame of oneself or others (Piotrowski et al., 2022).

    The National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R), administered from February 2001 to April 2003, determined that Americans aged 18 years and older, had an estimated lifetime prevalence of PTSD among men at 3.6% and among women at 9.7%. The National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (NVVRS), administered from November 1986 to February 1988 determined that of those veterans having served in the military during the Vietnam era, the estimated lifetime prevalence of PTSD was 30.9% for men and 26.9% for women. The prevalence of PTSD for Gulf War Veterans and Operation Iraqi Freedom is estimated to be 10.1%. Veterans having served in Afghanistan and Iraq have an estimated prevalence of 13.8%. Studies show that children having exposure to traumatic events may be subject to having a higher prevalence of PTSD, when compared to adults in the same population. Adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 were estimated to suffer from PTSD at a rate of 3.7% for males and 6.3% for females (VA.gov | Veterans Affairs, n.d.-b).

    Various treatment techniques and therapies exist that have known to offer improvement in some areas while lacking in other certain environments. Issues with unavailability of access to medical care, increased expense of prescription drugs, and the negative attitude that is often attached to those seeking mental health care. This stigma can discourage or prevent those coping with PTSD from fully realizing benefits from therapy. Common treatments for PTSD consist of cognitive-based psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies, but research reflects that 60-72% of sufferers continue to be diagnosed with PTSD in spite of receiving cognitive processing. Additionally, both cognitive-based psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies have significant dropout rates (Zaccari et al., 2020).

    Sleep disturbance and disturbing dreams are considered the main symptoms of PTSD due to these being the most commonly reported in up to 70% of individuals diagnosed with PTSD. Sleep disturbance is a typical physiological response to having experienced trauma and is associated with negative emotional, behavioral, and cognitive ramifications and relative sequelae. Studies show evidence supporting dispositional mindfulness providing an important adaptive strategy for managing trauma related sleep and emotion regulation disturbances. Mindfulness activities may help the practitioner to minimize trauma-related emotional struggles and hyperarousal by becoming more aware of immediate or current emotions and combined with a nonjudgmental viewpoint in the processing of these emotions that may lead to PTSD-related sleep disturbances (Nagy, et al., 2022). Research supports that the practice of yoga can help to enhance cognitive functioning that correlates to reducing PTSD symptoms while simultaneously increasing sleep quality and quality of life (Zaccari et al., 2020).

    A pilot study was conducted with 27 veteran participants diagnosed with PTSD and were recruited from mental health clinics of the Veteran Affairs Portland Health Care System (VAPORHCS). All participants had engaged in some previous type of trauma therapy. However, they were not to be simultaneously enrolled in another trauma processing therapy. The main goal of the study was to analyze the influence of specific yoga practices on response inhibition, PTSD symptoms, and relative cortisol levels in response to stress. The study incorporated trauma-sensitive yoga (TSY) that was based upon hatha-style yoga. Adjustments were incorporated for trauma sensitivity, such as instruction utilizing verbal guidance, elimination of hands-on physical adjustments, class format of a half-circle to allow participants to view the instructor and one another, and use of postures that specifically were not to facilitate adrenaline secretion. Of the 27 veterans who signed-up for this study, seventeen completed the intervention and postintervention assessment. They were required to self-report their symptoms of PTSD, and also their salivary cortisol levels at various intervals before and after practice sessions. Those that participated attended from 3 to 8 sessions total. Results showed improvements in sleep quality along with reductions in symptoms of depression, which support the previously known correlation linking sleep to depression. The change in reduced cortisol levels coincides with increases in the quality of life. This study indicated that yoga interventions such as trauma-sensitive yoga may enhance cognitive response inhibition, reduce symptoms of depression, improve sleep quality, reduce other PTSD symptoms and relative complaints (Zaccari et al., 2020).

    In another study supporting that yoga and other mindfulness-based practices offer other potential benefits for treatment of PTSD. Further research highlights that yoga promotes interoceptive awareness that can be channeled to address root difficulties related to PTSD, Interoceptive awareness helps to enhance the ability to palliatively process trauma symptoms without becoming severely overloaded. Participants reported an increase in their focus on body sensations, prolonged awareness of these sensations and self-regulation of stress by addressing these sensations. (Neukirch et al., 2019). Increased interoceptive awareness as well as self-regulation of the HPA-Axis through the practice of yoga, can potentially empower those suffering from PTSD to better self-manage cognitive-based therapies, and aid in successful management of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors which affect overall health and well-being.

    References

    Copeland, L. A., Finley, E. P., Rubin, M. L., Perkins, D. F., & Vogt, D. S. (2022). Emergence of probable PTSD among US veterans over the military-to-civilian transition. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1037/tra0001329.supp (Supplemental)

    Nagarajan, R., Krishnamoorthy, Y., Basavarachar, V., & Dakshinamoorthy, R. (2022). Prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder among survivors of severe COVID-19 infections: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Affective Disorders, 299, 52–59. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1016/j.jad.2021.11.040

    Nagy, S. M., Pickett, S. M., & Hunsanger, J. A. (2022). The relationship between mindfulness, PTSD-related sleep disturbance, and sleep quality: Contributions beyond emotion regulation difficulties. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 14(7), 1073–1079. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1037/tra0000572

    Neukirch, N., Reid, S., & Shires, A. (2019). Yoga for PTSD and the role of interoceptive awareness: A preliminary mixed-methods case series study. European Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 3(1), 7–15. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1016/j.ejtd.2018.10.003Piotrowski, N. A., PhD, & Range, L. M., PhD. (2022). Post-traumatic stress disorder. Magill’s Medical Guide (Online Edition).VA.gov | Veterans Affairs. (n.d.-b). Retrieved October 23, 2022, from https://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/treat/essentials/epidemiology.asp

    Zaccari, B., Callahan, M. L., Storzbach, D., McFarlane, N., Hudson, R., & Loftis, J. M. (2020). Yoga for veterans with PTSD: Cognitive functioning, mental health, and salivary cortisol. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 12(8), 913–917. https://doi-org.northernvermont.idm.oclc.org/10.1037/tra0000909.supp (Supplemental)

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease ptsd qigong specific methods of wellness practice stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/Yoga-as-a-Treatment-for-Post-Traumatic-Stress-Disorder Wed, 26 Apr 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Qigong – Heal the Mind With the Body – Detailed Description https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/Qigong-Heal-the-Mind-With-the-Body-Detailed-Description This is another post in my series of explaining qigong practices. Qi, Chi or Gi means air, energy or breath in Chinese and Korean. Gong or Kung means work. Qigong therefore translates to energy or breath work.

    The human body is made up of bones, muscles, and organs amongst other components. Veins, arteries and capillaries carry blood and nutrients throughout to all of the systems and components. Additionally, 12 major energy meridians carry the body’s energy. “lifeforce” also known as “qi”. Ones qi is stored in the lower Dan Tien. Daily emotional imbalances accumulate tension and stress gradually affecting all of the body’s systems.Each discomfort, nuisance, irritation or grudge continues to tighten and squeeze the flow of the life force. This is where “dis-ease” claims its foothold.

    Qigong breathing exercises can adjust the brainwaves to the Alpha state, where the mind is relaxed and the body chemistry changes and promotes natural healing. Relaxing of the deep skeletal muscles, and working outward as one tries to release tension accumulated within the muscles, organs and nerves. Whereas conventional physical exercise can deplete energy,Qi Gong helps to replenish your natural energy.

    Our emotional state directly influences how we breathe. The emotions reveal themselves in the breathing patterns:

    • Anger, fear, anxiety – shallow breaths
    • Grief – spasmodic breathing
    • Guilt – restricted breathing
    • Boredom – shallow, lifeless breathing
    • Sadness/depression – under breathing


    Furthermore:

    Dwelling in the past – can produce any of the above breathing patterns


    Worrying about the future – can produce any of the above breathing patterns


    Present in the moment – The goal here is clarity and self awareness to slow and regulate the breath


    Becoming present in the moment can happen in various ways such as:
    1) Immediate trauma – Fear of injury or loss of life can put one into the moment quickly.


    2) Practice of mindful exercises such as meditation, yoga, tai chi, qigong and other similar mind and body interactive practices.


    3) Engaging in activities such as singing, painting, performing music, dancing, etc.

    Qigong exercise can change brainwaves to the Alpha state:

    • Alpha – relaxed concentration, creative state
    • Beta – attentive, alert
    • Delta – unconscious
    • Theta – drowsy state of mind

    Benefits of Qigong exercises:

    • Boosts the immune system
    • Reduces stress, anxiety, depression, mood swings
    • Lowers blood pressure
    • Increases the body’s natural healing process
    • Lungs increase their capacity
    • Promotes better respiration and circulation
    • Enhanced self-awareness
    • Helps to change the body’s chemistry for the better

    Qigong utilizes regulated breathing, which calms emotions, which modulates the autonomic nervous system. This engages the parasympathetic nervous system that manages blood chemistry and relative hormones and neurotransmitters.. Blood chemistry affect organ function either in a positive or negative manner.


    Best Times:

    • morning (calm, nature awakening)
    • evenings (calm, tranquil)
    • anytime (even a few minutes)

    Best Locations to practice:

    • outside and peaceful
    • inside and uncluttered
    • anywhere possible

    Qigong practice is a solution to the current health care crisis, where we have seen a drastic increase in diabetes, obesity, depression, anxiety, stress, suicide and so many other mental and physically related health issues.

    Would it not be wise to at least consider preventing these ailments in the first place rather than using questionable pharmaceuticals and therapies after the fact? Folks, the horse has been out of the barn for many decades now. If government leaders, medical professionals, school boards and parents were to actually promote and encourage physical exercise, good nutrition, meditation and self-responsibility we might have a much different looking nation. Plant good seeds, no?

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/Qigong-Heal-the-Mind-With-the-Body-Detailed-Description Sat, 22 Apr 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Qigong – A Way to Heal the Mind, By Engaging the Body https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/Qigong-A-Way-to-Heal-the-Mind-By-Engaging-the-Body This is a continuation of my previous post of how we can use the knowledge within our thoughts to help to heal the ill, injured, damaged or traumatized human mind and body. Knowledge such as nutrition, appropriate exercise, management of sleep and healthy social relationships. This article delves in deeper on the practice of Qigong or breath work, in order to help heal our body by using knowledge, and conversely heal the mind by using physical exercises.

    No need for a gym membership, a mat, special equipment nor special clothing. Just some time, effort and a willingness to learn something different. Qigong practice is a solution to the current health care crisis, where we have seen a drastic increase in diabetes, obesity, depression, anxiety, stress, suicide and so many other mental and physically related health issues. Would it not be wise to at least consider preventing these ailments in the first place rather than using questionable pharmaceuticals and therapies after the fact? Folks, the horse has been out of the barn for many decades now. If government leaders, medical professionals, school boards and parents were to actually promote and encourage physical exercise, good nutrition, meditation and self-responsibility we might have a much different looking nation. Plant good seeds, no? Of course there will be some that look at Eastern methods of healthcare such as yoga, tai chi, qigong and meditation as that “weird stuff” that they don’t want their kids exposed to. So be it. Then maybe they can “do something” to fix all that ails our once great country.

    Qi, pronounced “chee,” means energy. You may see it spelled “Chi” or even “Ki” in Japanese, but they all carry the same meaning. Qi is the energy of the body, of the meridians, of food, of the universe. While it may seem a nebulous topic there are refined theories regarding the different types of Qi within the body, the creation and actions of Qi, and consequently, ways to determine where imbalances may arise. “Gong” or “Kung” means work or diligent effort. So qigong translates to “breath work.”

    Qigong or Chi Kung is breathing exercises, with little or no body movement, can be practiced while sitting, standing or moving, Regulation of the breath can adjust the brain waves to the Alpha state. When the mind is relaxed, the body chemistry changes and promotes natural healing. With deliberate regulated breaths, one is able to relax the deep skeletal muscles working outward, while releasing tension accumulated within the muscles, organs and nerves. Whereas conventional physical exercise can deplete energy, Qigong helps to replenish your natural energy.

    Qigong shares the same branch of origin as yoga. Both systems have sitting, standing and moving exercises with their respective curriculum. Both systems have a strong observance of the breathing mechanism and how it helps to balance out the mind, body and for some, spiritually and/or self-awareness. Qigong does have some exercises practiced like yoga on the ground, but curriculum really depends upon the teacher and intended participants. This curriculum is vast and holds many options and variations to help those that are injured, ill, disable and may have other limitations. The following graphics offer a window into what qigong exercises look like.

    Knowledgeable and well experienced teachers of qigong and yoga, will drill down into the details and subtle nuances of these practices. The development is in the details. Trying to learn these methods and the many specifics can be as easy or difficult as the practitioner cares to engage. However, one of the main benefits of these practices is that by occupying one’s thoughts with the physical details, the mind becomes more engaged with the body. This is where the true healing begins when the breathing frequency is deliberately slowed down, the nervous system adjust the delicate blood chemistry which in turn positively affects organ function.

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/Qigong-A-Way-to-Heal-the-Mind-By-Engaging-the-Body Wed, 19 Apr 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Heal the Mind With the Body, Heal the Body With the Mind https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/Heal-the-Mind-With-the-Body-Heal-the-Body-With-the-Mind Often the hands will solve a mystery that the intellect has struggled with in vain.

    – Carl Jung

    Our culture is broken. Out of balance. Many feel traumatized. So many people suffering. So much stress, depression, and anxiety. The solution is not always in pharmaceuticals, therapy, alcohol or recreational drugs. Exercising regularly can help and it is often FREE if you commit to the time and effort.

    Physical exercise is one of the single most beneficial mental and physical activities that we can do for ourselves on a regular basis. When we exercise, our brain produces many chemicals (hormones and neurotransmitters) that manage stress and counteract the sympathetic nervous response. If you are not currently exercising regularly, try to start by simply taking a walk around your block and build up from there. 5 minutes here and there throughout your day adds up cumulatively. One does not need to exercise for hours a day to gain the benefits. Walk, run , swim, stretch, weight train, or my preferences of qigong, tai chi and yoga. This is the “do something,” that will actually affect you and consequently those in your life.

    And we as a nation have been consistently reducing the importance of physical exercise to our youth, as many schools nationwide have greatly reduced and even eliminated physical education within schools on all levels. Perhaps this is why teenage depression, anxiety, ADHD, OCD and other ailments have been contributing to the spike in youth suicides over the last few decades. Broken children grow into broken adults. Plant good seeds and harvest a good yield. Plant with rotten seeds and the crop produced will be rotten. This is ancient knowledge that seems to have been forgotten in current times.

    Yin & Yang are relative terms, in relation to content and context. In the concept of Yin & Yang, nothing is
    permanent nor absolute. Opposites are complementary. Many philosophers and scholars view Yin & Yang as the
    motive force for the start, change and end of life. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is based upon the belief that
    the existence of the universe is due to the result of the interactions between Yin & Yang.

    Everyday Uses of Yin & Yang Theory:

    • Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)
    • Philosophy (Taoism & Confucianism)
    • Science (Chinese)
    • Meditation
    • Feng Shui
    • Spirituality
    • As a Trending Fad
    • Martial Arts
    • Qigong and Energy Movement

    Mind and body – most agree that our mind and body are important and there exists a balance and harmony between the two. Just because someone can repeat the words of “mind and body” does not necessarily mean they have an understanding of this relationship. How do we achieve this beyond just the mere words of “mind” and “body?’ We need to actually use our mind to manage and regulate not only our physical bodies but our thoughts and relative emotions. We need to truly engage our physical body in movement, physical activities and exercises in order to engage our cognitive brain functions. This is how we can link the mind and body together to achieve higher levels of both self-awareness, mental and physical health as well. Self-cultivation is not free in any sense of this understanding. This takes time, effort and often sacrifice of other things we deem as important.

    It is usually much easier to train our body, than it is to train our minds. By becoming aware of our body positions, alignments and movements, we train our minds by using our bodies. When we position our toes, our knees, the hips, the spine, the shoulders, and especially our breathing rhythm, we are disciplining our body into correct alignments that manifest into muscle and bone strength, increased blood and energy circulation and most specifically the change in the hormones within the blood chemistry that not only regulates organ function, but balances out emotional ups and downs.

    We can use the knowledge within our thoughts to help to heal our damaged body. Knowledge such as nutrition, appropriate exercise, management of sleep and healthy social relationships. So why is is such as stretch to consider that our body holds the keys to managing mental ailments linked to emotions of anxiety, depression, anger, grief and others?

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) anxiety chronic pain depression diabetes health care human behavior martial arts center for health mental health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/Heal-the-Mind-With-the-Body-Heal-the-Body-With-the-Mind Sat, 15 Apr 2023 13:46:08 GMT
    US Infant Mortality Rate Explodes in Recent Years https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/US-Infant-Mortality-Rate-Explodes-in-Recent-Years Anthropologists have studied and concluded that there are many varying perspectives and beliefs in defining what good health looks like within different cultures. While some views on healthcare are shared, some are quite different in their culture’s approach. For example, childbirth in the US is often viewed as an emergency medical event (medicalization of a natural human biological function) involving a hospital, various pregnancy specialists and quite often pharmaceuticals. It is important to realize that some births may be more complicated that others that may require a allopathic medical doctor to perform specific procedures to ensure the safety of the mother and infant child. Other developed countries like Holland and Sweden use the hospital but with less specialist intervention. Cultures within Yucatan Mexico use their homes and family members in the birthing process more similar to how humans have given birth for thousands of years of human history (James, 2020).

    Interesting to note and requiring further discussion is that, the US is far behind other countries in the use of midwives for delivery of babies than most other wealthy and developed nations, in spite of the US by far having a higher infant mortality rate in recent years. Correlation does not necessarily imply causation, however…..

    https://tcf.org/content/commentary/worsening-u-s-maternal-health-crisis-three-graphs/

    I think it is important to understand why the US has moved more towards medical physicians, pharmaceuticals and surgeries not only for childbirth but for many if not most health issues, ailments and diseases. Basically, we have been sold that western medicine is better than alternatives and often methods that have been time-proven for many years past, e.g. diet vs. pills. Severe trauma, yes use a medical doctor; high blood pressure, anxiety, depression – check your food intake, exercise, activity and stress levels.

    “Several important milestones happened in the early part of the 1900’s that had a profound impact on midwifery: The 1910 Flexner Report recommended hospital deliveries and the abolition of midwifery. The study has since been recognized for its racist, sexist, and classist approach to medical education”

    “A stark divide began to take root in the 1800’s, when white male physicians began to explore childbirth with greater interest. Their approach was based on a colonialization framework, which devalued birth as ceremony and focused instead on the physical aspect of wellbeing.  

    Many doctors opposed midwife-assisted births. They launched campaigns against the profession, promoting Western science and the pain relief that hospitals could offer. By the turn of the century, they attended approximately half of births, despite having little training in obstetrics.  

    In rural America, however, midwives continued to attend births. In the Southern states, Black midwives, sometimes called “granny” midwives, attended up to 75% of births until the 1940’s. A combination of laws, educational restrictions, and campaigns against the profession led to the dismantling of their practice” (A Brief History of Midwifery in America | OHSU, n.d.).

    So here we are once again, especially over the last 3 years, that the US medical community and astonishing US politicians often tout how great the US’s healthcare system is at providing the best, the safest, the most effective, the most innovative and best technological healthcare in the world. Do your own research and you will find out that the US is often none of these aforementioned. The charade, the fallacy, the wizard behind the curtain, is often the way the US healthcare system works. It is indeed not “healthcare” but “sickcare”.

    https://www.statista.com/chart/23559/midwives-per-capita/

    A Closer Look at America's Infant Mortality Rate

    References:

    James, R. (2020, July 24). Medical Anthropology 101 [Movie]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4SvvLnrk77I

    https://tcf.org/content/commentary/worsening-u-s-maternal-health-crisis-three-graphs/

    https://www.healthify.us/healthify-insights/a-closer-look-at-americas-infant-mortality-rate

    https://www.statista.com/chart/23559/midwives-per-capita/

    https://www.ohsu.edu/womens-health/brief-history-midwifery-america

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain diabetes health care martial arts center for health midwives obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi us healthcare (sickcare) winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/4/US-Infant-Mortality-Rate-Explodes-in-Recent-Years Mon, 03 Apr 2023 07:38:33 GMT
    The Gears of Life – Our Journey Around the Sun https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/The-Gears-of-Life-Our-Journey-Around-the-Sun A universal truth cannot be easily disputed, as everyone can agree on some level with the facts in question. Other universal truths are that water in its liquid state is wet, the sun rises in the east and sets in the west, and that humans are mortals and eventually die in our physical form. The truth is that we come into this world on the physical level with nothing, and we leave with nothing. The earth’s yearly journey around the sun is another such universal truth.

    It is easy to see how the time of the day affects us. If you pay attention to it you will see the pattern. During a 24-hour period, our body, energy and emotions change. Knowing this pattern makes daily life much easier. This pattern is known as the Horary Cycle or Circadian Rhythm.

     

    • Some of these relationships might seem somewhat obvious as children have a sprouting or growing personality learning and showing their identity and ego from 0-8 years of age.
    • A person from 8-33 is seen as flowering or showing their creativity, intelligence, attractiveness and excessive behavior.
    • The 33-58 is the fruition years where one starts to blossom as an adult using their knowledge and experience to further their career, family and material assets.
    • 58-83 brings the harvest of what was nurtured or squandered from the previous years becomes more apparent. Health issues arrive if prior neglect is not addressed.
    • The last season of transformation from 83-108 is a reflection on what was accomplished mentally, physically and spiritually throughout the prior phases. The realization of self and that the material possessions are only temporary up until this point.

    These truths will still be debated given an audience and someone willing to debate these facts. Often times people will make claims to their “truth” or someone else’s “truth,” where my understanding is that their can only be one truth for a particular topic, but maybe an unlimited number of ways someone can experience the truth, as in their unique reality. We all experience the climatic seasons somewhat differently, but nature without a doubt makes the distinction between summer and winter, daytime and nighttime, everything is impermanent and changing. Either we choose to live in harmony with the patterns of nature, or we become subject to the consequences of attempting to live in opposition to nature.

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain depression diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease philosophical concepts qigong stress management stress relief tai chi trauma winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/The-Gears-of-Life-Our-Journey-Around-the-Sun Wed, 29 Mar 2023 06:39:01 GMT
    Energy Vampire or Energy Sun -Which Are You? https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/Energy-Vampire-or-Energy-Sun--Which-Are-You We have probably all meet people who when walking into a room, drain the energy of all in their company. Or conversely, the person who comes in and brings up everyone energy and puts a smile on everyone’s’ face. Yin and yang in all things!

    Perform a bit of self-reflection. When you walk into a room, do you bring in your positive energy and personality that can lift others up?

    Energy Sun

    Or do you do the exact opposite by bringing everyone down with your negativity and pessimism?

    Energy Vampire

    None of us are perfect, but should be doing our best to bring more optimism, compassion and empathy into the world? So many people claim to want to change and/or save the world, when they can’t even change themselves for the better. Make your own bed. Check your own backyard. Clean your own house, before you pontificate about others should or shouldn’t do. This is how we can make the world a better place. Start in your own home, looking in your own mirror.

    Be well, become healthy, be wise.

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain depression diabetes health care human behavior martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/Energy-Vampire-or-Energy-Sun--Which-Are-You Mon, 27 Mar 2023 07:38:59 GMT
    Luxury Taxing of Medical Procedures https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/Luxury-Taxing-of-Medical-Procedures Tax US citizens for medical procedures due to relative lifestyle choices? This type of reasoning could also be used then to penalize and tax people who eat fast or junk food by saying that they have an option to eat healthier or otherwise. Or perhaps we begin to tax parents for providing orthodontic services which are often not covered by insurance due to the cosmetic nature of the procedures. Where does this type of rationing end? I do not think it is the responsibility of the government to be the morality or vanity police, but support and create legislation that does not have the potential to divide people, due to their choosing procedures that may be considered to some and not others as essential or not to the individual.

    There are many studies and reports of wasted tax income that goes to frivolous expenditures like those reported by Forbes such as taxpayers funded story time at laundromats ($248,200); sex education for prostitutes in Ethiopia ($2.1 million) and Ivy League, Inc. (the eight Ivy universities) received $9.8 billion in federal grants despite having a collective endowment of $140 billion, up $20 billion since 2016.

    Forbes goes on to report that of the US governmental agencies receiving the highest amount of funding for 2017-2019 was the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) having received $1.5 trillion in grants – which was approximately seven of every ten dollars. Twenty-one other governmental agencies were awarded $1 billion or more in grants. Obviously, these are very big dollar numbers and not knowing exactly how the monies were spent can open a debate of if the funds were actually used wisely for the American people. So, where I don’t think, the government should move to impose a “cosmetic tax” I do think the government should be held more accountable for the vast amounts of money that is possibly being spent on frivolous projects that do not help the American people as whole.

    There are many good points on many sides of this issue. As long there is open dialogue by whomever ultimately make these decisions to pass legislation, there is some hope for fair and reasonable measures to be installed. I am all in for helping those who need assistance and cannot work or pay for their basic needs; not so much for those who choose to not work for their needs and wants. Our government has the resources to provide for those in need, but I feel the root problem is in the poor administration and/or management of the already existing resources.

    With that being said, there are many types of cosmetic or elective procedures/surgeries that are not necessarily covered by insurance companies. Some of these procedures could be deemed as a positive factor whether physically or mentally to the patient. Or perhaps detrimental to the patient in not just physical appearance but in accompanying mental issues, such as depression, low self-esteem, bullying and probably others. Who gets to decide if these are necessary procedures or luxury items to be taxed? I see the following cosmetic examples as being questionable:

    • Craniofacial Surgery – examples would be birth defects, cleft palates, auricular issues, etc.
    • Reconstructive Surgery After Disease or Injury – examples like animal bites, injury from trauma, scarring from disease
    • Correction of a Deviated Septum – example such as sinus issues, breathing problems, injury or trauma, snoring which affects sleep quality
    • Breast Reduction – can cause back, neck and shoulder issues
    • Breast Reconstruction – cancers, but also traumatic injury, abuse
    • Eyelid Procedures – issues can affect sight, ability to drive, work, etc.

    There is the discussion if straight teeth are considered cosmetic or otherwise? Also, wisdom teeth removal. Both of these issues can be lived with, but there is much information that the straightness of the teeth can affect eating habits resulting in better or worth chewing of certain foods, which can lead someone to choose some foods that are easier to chew but less nutritional over ones that are healthier but require more mastication. A healthy smile also improves self-esteem which lowers stress and relative stress hormones.

    References:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279590/

    https://www.northtexasplasticsurgery.com/blog/6-examples-of-when-plastic-surgery-is-medically-necessary

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamandrzejewski/2020/09/30/wheres-the-pork-us-taxpayers-funded-a-lot-of-wasteful-spending-2017-2019/?sh=79aae41d3dc0

    _______________

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi us healthcare (sickcare) winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/Luxury-Taxing-of-Medical-Procedures Wed, 22 Mar 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Performance Enhancing Drug Usage https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/Performance-Enhancing-Drug-Usage I have found that when athletes use PEDs (performance enhancing drugs) there is the possibility of side-effects from using such drugs. Although some of these drugs or supplements are deemed as safe for human consumption by the FDA, there are still concerns of overuse, abuse, allergic reactions, and other issues that might affect one individual differently than another. The user needs to accept the responsibility to read product labels and conduct their own research to best determine what ingredients are used and if they are safe for the individual user and not the general public as a whole.

    https://trinitonian.com/2018/04/25/athletics-dept-to-begin-testing-for-athlete-drug-use/

    When examined as a societal issue, I think that it sends the wrong message that it is fine to bypass the hard work, time and effort that is often sacrificed in order to achieve a particular goal relative to better physical performance for whatever sport one is pursuing. With the competition that is inherent within most organized sports, PEDs are bound to cause issues of jealousy and envy as some athletes will develop animosity towards others that are seen as cheating or acquiring an “edge” over other competitors.

    This discussion can again lead back into last week’s talk about people looking for and relying upon pharmaceuticals to cure all our illnesses and diseases. However, in this case it would be drugs to not only fix our health problems, but to maybe fix issues of low self-esteem, ego, and other psychological imbalances due to the highly competitive nature of organized sports.

    I don’t really see much of a difference between illegal and legal PEDs, when it appears as if many of the supplements that go unregulated as well as those approved by the FDA for prescription use only, are widely available to anyone looking to purchase and use these products at their own risk. Perhaps the whole industry and the FDA are in need of closer scrutiny as to conflicts of interest when it comes to regulating products that have become such a large health issue in sports on all levels.

    References:

    https://www.healthline.com/health/legal-steroids#alternatives

    Edlin, G., & Golanty, E. (2019). Health & Wellness (13th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning

    https://taylorhooton.org/how-easy-it-is-to-get-steroids/

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi us healthcare (sickcare) winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/Performance-Enhancing-Drug-Usage Sat, 18 Mar 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Food Label Ambiguity https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/Food-Label-Ambiguity Labeling on foods can often be misleading, vague, or complicated for the uninformed. I feel that this is a way that food companies can be dishonest by perhaps changing the serving size to be half the portion, making it seem that the fat content is half as much. Food labeling can be like a shell game where if you don’t pay attention to the wording and amounts, it is easy to believe whatever the food companies wish one to believe in order to purchase their products.

    It appears to me that the US government (FDA) that regulates the food companies, have more rights than the consumers buying their products. Unless one becomes well versed in the product labeling, which most people are not in my opinion, it is very easy to think that we are purchasing and ultimately consuming healthy food products where in reality we are not.

    I am in favor of total transparency on food labeling, as to what the nutritional values are, what actual ingredients are included naturally and what is chemically added in the process of preparing for resale. Then let the consumer decide for themselves if they want to purchase a product that is loaded with whatever additives or preservatives. There is a reason why the shelf life for some processed foods is literally years. Why would I think otherwise that these same chemicals would not end up “preserving” something within my body that should not be preserved?

    I have a relative who is a food chemist. Years back he shared with me that one of the most common food colorings, called carmine is a natural red dye also labeled as cochineal extract, E120 or natural red 4, that comes from the female cochineal bug. Even if crushed bugs are not toxic, I think consumers should be able to find this fact more easily than having to research every ingredient for alternative names.

    I read food labels constantly when I shop. I choose to monitor how much sodium and other additives are in foods that I purchase and prepare. Anything frozen, processed, prepared in advance or in a can are often the worst for us as they are at least loaded with salt as a natural preservative and often other chemicals to add shelf life. I have dabbled in the organic food labels also. These can be misleading also as there are various classifications for what can be considered as organic. One really has to take the self-responsibility to pursue the due diligence if one wants to better manage what they consume.

    References:

    https://recipes.howstuffworks.com/food-science/carmine.htm

    https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2012/03/22/organic-101-what-usda-organic-label-means?page=1

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain diabetes diet & nutrition health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/Food-Label-Ambiguity Wed, 15 Mar 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    Underage Drinking and Smoking https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/Underage-Drinking-and-Smoking Underage drinking on US college campuses has skyrocketed over the last few years, as our youth and seemingly everyone, struggles to cope with mental ailments of depression, anxiety, ADHD and others. The apparent ease of obtaining fake ID’s makes it abhorrently obvious that these institutions and their relative law enforcement, care to turn on blind eye and let the alcohol abuse continue, as long as they themselves are not held responsible or liable when the shit goes sideways. How ironic it is that if someone is caught in the possession of a fake ID, they could be facing a third-degree felony charge, and a potential 5 year jail sentence, and a fine up to $5000, depending upon the state that they get caught within – in spite of the fact that fakes are readily available online (https://blogote.com/10-best-fake-id-websites-complete-reviews-2022/)

    If you are a parent of a kid away at school and don’t think that yours is drinking, smoking and trying whatever drug they please, you my friend are living in a fantasy land, a state of denial or what is more likely described as cognitive dissonance. “Cognitive dissonance is the unpleasant emotion that results from holding two contradictory beliefs, attitudes, or behaviors at the same time” (Halton, 2022). Examples of how are society embraces cognitive dissonance would be:

    • The whole tobacco/vape industry. The tobacco industry is probably the only industry which the FDA willfully allows (but not approves of) to operate in spite of the scientific studies that prove the harmful effects to humans. So, while the FDA is basically in place to protect the American population against substances that endanger the health and well-being of humans, they continue to pander to this deadly industry. It has even been proven that the tobacco companies conspired to make their products more addictive, but these companies are still allowed to operate and earn profits (Kodjak, 2017).
    • We know that our population is dangerously unhealthy, nutrient deprived, overweight or obese, affecting our health, well-being and even the security of our defense as most young adults cannot pass the physical exams to be in the military. Yet, we and our government do little to make this a priority. In the words of Dr. Jerome Adams, the former surgeon general of the United States, “You know what will make you and your community healthier but still, you choose not to do it.” He goes on to state that 7 out of 10 of 18-24-year olds are ineligible for military service. They cannot pass the physical, can’t meet educational requirements, or have a criminal history (TEDx Talks, 2020).
    • It is common knowledge that our population, and especially our youth have been experiencing more stress, more depression, more anxiety and more suicides than any other time and even prior to our recent health crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic. Again, we and our government leaders seem to accept this, by not making it a high priority.

    These issues and many others will not improve due to a lack of money or resources but rather a lack of moral character and fortitude to actually do what it takes to fix our broken culture. Our government can print a few trillion dollars at a moments notice, often billions of dollars for other countries needs and agendas. But won’t do what it takes to fix our own problems. Why? Because fixing some of these problems would put a lot of companies out of business and investors would lose their ill-gotten gains.

    This topic of underage usage of legal substances of marijuana, alcohol and tobacco products is quite relative to current cultural and societal issues. As a parent of two college-age kids, I now have a different perspective than when I was their age and even as a young parent. I personally did much of my experimentation in my early teens as I had access to all of the aforementioned. My parents were either unaware or chose not to appear to know of my actions. I think that back in the 70’s and 80’s many kids were experimenting regardless of what their parents knew or didn’t know. So, what I have learned as a parent is that the more you try to shield or restrict kids from whatever behavior, they will pursue it more out of curiosity, defiance, and rebellion. If we teach and explain issues from a point of concern, love, and respect we have a much better chance of youths making better informed decisions on their own.

    I have had pretty much this same conversation with both of my now grown kids, letting them know that I do not encourage underage use, nor “of age” abuse of any of these substances. I also let them know that I am not naïve as to what young adults are doing and the peer pressure that they live within on a daily basis. I am their parent, their guide and sometimes their lifesaver, and I remind them of this.

    Drug legality is more of a function of social, political, and economic factors not necessarily related to the toxicity or pharmacology of a particular substance. Some drugs are deemed as unsafe by the powers that be (FDA), while others are judged to be safe but can be just as abused and dangerous. Those that offer adverse or deadly side effects are mostly the ones that become illegal. As social acceptance changes, along with peoples’ individual beliefs, legal status of drugs will continue to be in a constant state of change and adjustment. During the early years of the twentieth century, drugs such as opium, morphine, and cocaine were openly sold but later banned is illegal substances. Marijuana was legal throughout the US until 1937, then it was illegal and now it is becoming more legal again throughout much of the United States (Tikkanen, n.d.).

    If we look at the seemingly unlimited resources of the US federal government to fund the “war on drugs” we can see that money, arrests and prison sentences has not been working for the last decades. However, with unlimited resources used more wisely for early education, I feel that knowledge is a root component to not just fix problems in our society, but rather to prevent or decrease the negative consequences. When I saw a movie called “Scared Straight” in middle school, a documentary about life in prison, I received the message. When I saw movies about STD’s in middle school with pictures and interviews of diseased people, I got the message. When my school had a completely crushed car from a DUI accident with a fatality, prominently displayed in the courtyard, I again received the message. From here it was up to me to be responsible to make wise decisions that would affect my life and those around me.

    References:

    Adams, Jerome, “How resilient communities can create a healthier country.” Youtube, uploaded by TEDxMidAtlantic. September 23, 2020.   www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIY13uvlGLY

    Halton, C. (2022, September 29). Cognitive Dissonance. Investopedia. https://www.investopedia.com/terms/c/cognitive-dissonance.asp

    Kodjak, A. (2017, November 27). In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive. NPR. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/11/27/566014966/in-ads-tobacco-companies-admit-they-made-cigarettes-more-addictive

    Edlin, G., & Golanty, E. (2019). Health & Wellness (13th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning

    Tikkanen, A. (n.d.). Why Is Marijuana Illegal in the U.S.? Encyclopedia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/story/why-is-marijuana-illegal-in-the-us#:~:text=He%20believed%20that%20smoking%20pot,illegal%20across%20the%20United%20States.

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi us healthcare (sickcare) winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/Underage-Drinking-and-Smoking Sat, 11 Mar 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    High Cholesterol Levels and Risk of Heart Disease https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/High-Cholesterol-Levels-and-Risk-of-Heart-Disease People in Japan or southern European countries have one-half to one-third the risk of dying from heart disease in comparison with people from the United States or northern Europe, even when their cholesterol levels, on average, are the same. A person with a cholesterol level of 250 mg/dl in Denmark has a two to three times greater risk of a fatal heart attack compared with an Italian with the same cholesterol level.

    These numbers can be misleading if only taking into account the total cholesterol level as opposed to the ratio of the “good” high cholesterol or high-density lipoproteins (HDL) included in the total cholesterol figure. For example, the seemingly high total cholesterol level of 240 mg/dl may not be of concern if there is also a higher HDL level such as 35-60 mg/dl and therefore producing a lower ratio. A higher ratio (lower HDL level) could be interpreted as having a higher risk of heart disease whereas a lower ratio (higher HDL level) would equate to a lower risk.

    The disparity between various cultures having high averages for total cholesterol levels may not be taking into account the dietary intake of a particular country possibly having more HDLs in their diet. The typical French diet was stated to have much fat, along with meats and eggs. Eggs are reported to be a good source of HDL. The typical Italian diet, or more specifically the Mediterranean diet may also include high sources of HDLs such as fish, nuts, and olive oil. This diet also focuses on less intake of sugars and other processed foods. On the other hand, the typical American diet has many high LDHs (low-density lipoproteins) coming from fatty beef, whole dairy products, potato chips, bakery items, fried foods and other processed meats and foods.

    This leads me to believe that the cholesterol numbers don’t always reflect the actual quality of the foods that a particular culture consumes.

    So, I think that is someone ingests mostly poor-quality food that contains high amounts of sugar, high amounts of LDHs, low amounts of HDLs, and lives a mostly sedentary lifestyle, their risk of having heart disease and other relative illnesses will dramatically increase.

    References:

    Edlin, G., & Golanty, E. (2019). Health & Wellness (13th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning

    Keck Medicine of USC. (2022, September 1). What Is the Difference Between Good and Bad Cholesterol? https://www.keckmedicine.org/blog/what-is-the-difference-between-good-and-bad-cholesterol/

    HDL & LDL: What You Need to Know About Good and Bad Cholesterol. (2021, September 28). Allrecipes. https://www.allrecipes.com/article/hdl-vs-ldl-cholesterol/

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317332

    ___________________

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

    ]]>
    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain diabetes diet & nutrition health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress stress management stress relief tai chi winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/High-Cholesterol-Levels-and-Risk-of-Heart-Disease Wed, 08 Mar 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    We Wonder Why Our Population Is So Unhealthy https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/We-Wonder-Why-Our-Population-Is-So-Unhealthy – Depression (10%) and anxiety (63%) at all time highs (especially for teenage girls 60%)

    – Being overweight (30%), obese (41.9%) and diabetic (11.3%) at record highs

    – Vitamin D deficiency (42%) at record highs due to less outside activity involving sunlight

    – Osteoporosis rate is skyrocketing due to poor diet and less physical activity

    – Most people don’t consume enough daily fruits and vegetables

    The root causes:

    poor diet

    low physical activity

    loss of purpose and life direction

    Try a class within a community of like-minded health-oriented people:

    Tai chi/qigong/wellness classes at:

    The University Club of Winter Park

    841 N Park Ave, Winter Park, FL 32789

    Thursdays, 11:30am-12:30pm

    Winter Park Presbyterian Church

    400 S. Lakemont Ave.

    Winter Park, FL 32789

    Mondays and Fridays, 11:30am-12:30pm

    $10 for drop-in class or quantity discounts

    Contact to confirm attendance at 407-234-0119

    I also offer instruction and lectures for qigong, Taoist yoga, tai chi, martial arts, ship pal gye, hapkido, fitness, wellness and many other avenues to improve health and well-being.

    I am currently accepting new clients for group, small group & private instruction in Wekiva and Longwood areas.

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Be well, become healthier, be wise!

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan

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    [email protected] (www.MindandBodyExercises.com) chronic pain diabetes health care martial arts center for health obesity osteoporosis parkinsons disease qigong stress management stress relief tai chi us healthcare (sickcare) winter park presbyterian winter park tai chi yoga https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/We-Wonder-Why-Our-Population-Is-So-Unhealthy Sat, 04 Mar 2023 05:00:00 GMT
    All Working Together – The FDA, Big Pharma and US Academia – It’s All About the Money Baby! https://www.mindandbodyexercises.com/blog/2023/3/All-Working-Together-The-FDA-Big-Pharma-and-US-Academia-It-s-All-About-the-Money-Baby Dr. Jon Jureidini is a child psychiatrist in Australia. He is part of the Critical and Ethical Mental Health (CEMH), which is a research group within the Robinson Research Institute. The CEMH conducts critical appraisal, meta-research, teaching, and advocacy, with the goal of promoting safer, more effective and more ethical research and practice in the field of mental health (Staff Directory | Dr Jon Jureidini, n.d.). Dr. Jon Jureidini reports that medicine is mostly dominated by a few very large and competing pharmaceutical companies, that are quite aligned in their methods to expand their profits. He reports on the issues of evidence-based medicine being compromised by the commercialization of academia, failed regulation and other corporate influences. This doctor sees the scientific progress being abused by the medical industry and its relationship with academic researchers, as they often do not share raw data, suppress negative trial results, and fail to report adverse events. Because of this, there is a greater potential for patient death, due to commercial interests influence upon regulators, research agenda, and universities. He strongly suggests that reforms need to be made in all of these areas, in order to bring trust and legitimacy back to evidence-based medicine. Jureidini calls for a separation of regulators from drug company funding, due to regulators often accept funding and industry funded trials in order to approve drugs that a particular company is trying to market (Jureidini, 2022).

    Lydia Green, a pharmacist, and former pharmaceutical advertising copywriter speaks about her goals of decreasing the sway of influence of pharmaceutical marketing and misinformation on the American healthcare industry. America contributes only 5% to the population of the world yet spends 1/3 of the world’s $1.4 trillion pharmaceutical healthcare marketplace. In spite of spending the most, the US often ranks low on the overall health of its population. Medicine is all about the money, and a patient’s well-being maybe second. These pharmaceutical companies are businesses that at their root, just like all business, operate to make a profit. Again, it is all about the money. When healthcare and its relative components of pharmaceuticals, doctors, and the profits that both can gain from promoting their products, in spite of actual need – this whole system is severely corrupt and broken and in need of drastic reform. Green proposes a need for a 3rd party agency to help return trust, in regard to the pharmaceutical industry. This alliance would be made up of communicators, marketers, former pharma-ad writers, medical and pharmacy schools, and doctors that have no influence from companies with profits as their sole motivation. However, Green suggests that such an organization could be funded through payments, but once again from fees attached to monies that pharmaceutical and medical device companies make to doctors (TEDx Talks, 2020b).

    I found an article containing much information on how direct-to-consumer (DTC) ads for the US pharmaceutical industry, proliferated a $5.4 billion marketing campaign back in 2015. The U.S. is one of only 2 countries that legally allow DTC for drug companies. New Zealand is the other. Not coincidently, Americans pay more for drugs and medical devices than any other country in the world (Drugwatch, 2022). Michelle Llamas, a Board-Certified Patient Advocate (BCPA) has a long list of experience, but what makes her credible to this article is her almost a decade of medical writing and research experience. She is a trusted source for information on high-risk prescriptions, health conditions, drugs and medical devices (Drugwatch, 2023).

    Drug companies often invest billions of dollars in their attempts to promote off-labeling of their drugs and/or devices that are not approved for other uses by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Companies try to convince doctors to prescribe their brand-name drugs or devices, for uses other than their original approval. Additionally, drug companies sometimes create clinical trials focused on swaying doctors and educational courses to highlight expensive drugs for non-FDA-approved uses, in spite of having no scientific evidence of efficacy nor safety. Drug and device companies spent in 2015, about $4 billion on television ads, and about $1.5 billion in magazine advertising. Radio, theaters, newspapers, billboards, and some other types of marketing took up an additional few million dollars. It paid off for these companies to advertise, as every dollar spent on advertising generated increased sales of prescription drugs by $4.40. Big pharmaceutical companies are willing to gamble on being fined for a few hundred million dollars, in spite of their product being found to cause adverse effects, if they know that they can market a product that may generate billions of dollars in profit (Drugwatch, 2022). From a business perspective, this is a good business model. From an ethics perspective, this is downright criminal and inhumane.

    “The approval of rofecoxib (Vioxx) by the US Food and Drug Administration has led to the “single greatest drug safety catastrophe in the history of this country or the history of the world,” charged one of the agency’s own experts, Dr David Graham, in US Senate hearings last Thursday.

    Dr Graham, associate director in the FDA’s Office of Drug Safety, said an estimated 88,000 to 139,000 Americans had heart attacks and strokes as a result of taking rofecoxib. The number, he said, far exceeds earlier disasters such as the 100 children killed in the United States by an elixir of sulfanilamide in the 1930s and the 5000 to 10,000 children born in the 1960s with birth defects related to thalidomide. Both events led to sweeping regulatory changes in the United States.”

    A forthcoming article for the special issue of the Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics (JLME), edited by Marc Rodwin and supported by the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, presents evidence that about 90 percent of all new drugs approved by the FDA over the past 30 years are little or no more effective for patients than existing drugs.

    References:

    Lenzer J. (2004). FDA is incapable of protecting US “against another Vioxx”. BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 329(7477), 1253. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.329.7477.1253

    Risky Drugs: Why The FDA Cannot Be Trusted. (2013, July 17). Edmond & Lily Safra Center for Ethics. https://ethics.harvard.edu/blog/risky-drugs-why-fda-cannot-be-trusted

    Hidden conflicts? Pharma payments to FDA advisers after drug approvals spark ethical concerns. (2023, February 22). Science | AAAS. https://www.science.org/content/article/hidden-conflicts-pharma-payments-fda-advisers-after-drug-approvals-spark-ethical

    Drugwatch. (2022, November 21). Selling Side Effects – Big Pharma’s Marketing Machine. Drugwatch.com. https://www.drugwatch.com/featured/big-pharma-marketing/Links to an external site.

    Drugwatch. (2023, February 23). Michelle Llamas – Drugwatch Senior Writer. Drugwatch.com. https://www.drugwatch.com/authors/mllamas/Links to an external site.

    Jureidini, J. (2022, March 16). The illusion of evidence based medicine. The BMJ. https://www.bmj.com/content/376/bmj.o702Links to an external site.

    Staff Directory | Dr Jon Jureidini. (n.d.). https://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/jon.jureidiniLinks to an external site.

    TEDx Talks. (2020b, November 23). Why Drug Marketing Rules American Healthcare and What We Can Do About it | Lydia Green | TEDxMcphs. YouTube.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jh7rQbknPyE

    I write often about topics that affect our health and well-being. Additionally, I teach and offer lecture about qigong, tai chi, baguazhang, and yoga. I also have hundreds of FREE education video classes, lectures and seminars available on my YouTube channel at:

    https://www.youtube.com/c/MindandBodyExercises

    Mind and Body Exercises on Google: https://posts.gle/aD47Qo

    Jim Moltzan

    407-234-0119

    www.MindAndBodyExercises.com

    www.Amazon.com/author/jimmoltzan